Recently Published

Sculpture of Agrippina crowning her young son Nero (c. 54–59 AD)

On the women who made imperial Rome.

Section of the Thai- Burma Railway along the River Kwai, Thailand, December 2009.

The Thai-Burma railway was built by prisoners of war in appalling conditions. The dead were treated with a dignity denied the living.

Boys just want to have fun: February scene from the Trivulzio tapestry, by Benedetto da Milano, after a design by Bramantino, Milan, 1504-9.

Venetian officials sought to stem a ‘plague’ of sodomy by promoting the heterosexual sex trade.

A warped path from Caspar David Friedrich to Adolf Hitler arrives at the dark heart of German Romanticism. Does a painting represent human triumph or a humbling? The answer is in the ideological eye of the beholder.

City on the hill: the south-west face of Lincoln Cathedral. Illustration by Arthur Wilde Parsons, 1888.

An Icelandic scholar exemplifies the rich cultural exchanges of the Middle Ages.

Lithograph of Kandahar by Lieutenant James Rattray, 1848.

The story of Afghanistan from the 13th century until the present illuminates why the international intervention that began in 2001 failed to deliver.

A life examined: Rosalind Franklin, c.1950.

Rosalind Franklin’s work was pivotal to one of the 20th century’s greatest scientific discoveries.

Flag of the United States of America with 34 stars, made of wool and cotton by Mrs John E. Forbes, 1861-63.

A wise and readable narrative history of the United States is a reminder of how tenaciously previous generations have clung to the view that the country is the ‘last, best hope of earth’.

Michael Scott.

‘The most common misconception about my field is that classicists study a past that no longer impacts on our world today.’

O Captain!: Wilhelm Voigt as  drawn by Ernst Kellermann in Simplicissimus, 12 January 1906.

Germany is the country most closely associated with militarism, but Britain has had its militarist moments, too.