History Today Flash Sale

Recently Published

King Oliver and his Creole Jazz Band, Chicago, 1923, showing Louis Armstrong and his wife, Lil Hardin © Gilles Petard/Redferns/Getty Images

For many Americans, jazz was the music of demons, devils and things that go bump in the night.

Propaganda poster, c.1970 © Getty Images

What do the tyrants of the 20th century have in common? Terror, confusion and quasi-religious followings.

Friedrich Nietzsche, by Edvard Munch, c.1906. © Munch Museet, Oslo, Norway/Bridgeman Images

As a frontline soldier in the First World War, the German artist Otto Dix fell under the spell of the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche and his assault on Christian morality.

August 1967: Police clash with protestors at the Hong Kong tram workers strike. Wiki Commons.

Hong Kong’s current extradition law crisis is not the first that the territory has faced.

Nativity, from the Psalter of Ingeborg of Denmark, c.1210 © Bridgeman Images

Medieval French monarchs used – and abused – the charismatic power of religious women.

Spreading the word: Louis carrying the Sceptre and Hand of Justice from Registre des Ordonnances de l’Hôtel du Roi, c.1320

For Louis, the conversion of Muslims to Christianity, ideally by peaceful means, was important. 

Lyons Tearoom, Piccadilly.

This podcast looks at how Isidore Salmon, the force behind J Lyons & Co., threatened to withdraw advertising from the Daily Mail and Daily Mirror in 1934.

Siege of Damascus during the Second Crusade, 1148. British Library.

In our latest podcast, Dan Jones discusses the year 1147, when the Second Crusade was launched.

Waltham Abbey, Essex, c.1840, Peter De Wint. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Exploring Essex beyond the stereotypes.

Gabriele D'Annunzio and supporters in Fiume. 1919.

The poet’s conquest of the Adriatic city of Fiume in 1919 was flamboyant, comedic and never likely to last – but it ushered in a new era of showman politics across Europe.