Recently Published

Bronze relief panel from the Gutenberg Monument in Mainz, by David d’Angers, 1840.

How one of the greatest advances in human culture also helped divide Christendom.  

Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn Observed by Queen Katherine (1870), by Marcus Stone.

For the lesser-known members of the great Tudor dynasties, loyalties were divided. Should you support your king, queen or family?

US Marines evacuating wounded comrades, Kut al-Amara, 3 April 2003. (Gilles Bassignac/Gamma-Rapho, Paris)

Two imperial ventures, in the same Middle East town a century apart, reveal the similarities – and differences – in the exercise of power.

A pagan queen, an unruly woman and a valiant warrior: Boudica has lived a varied afterlife in British history. Why is the ancient queen of the Iceni such an enduring figure?

Detail from A Brothel Converted to  a Convent by Jan Milíč  of Kroměříž’, from the Slav Epic, by Alphonse Marie Mucha, 1916.

The modern belief that the Middle Ages was a time of ignorance and superstition means that we often end up believing fantastic stories, too, as the tale of a Czech preacher and his emperor demonstrates.

Robert  Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool, portrait by Thomas Lawrence, 1820.

The prime minister at the time of Napoleon’s defeat was a keen observer of European politics. His government sought a balance of power on the Continent, but with minimal British engagement.

As the Battle of Britain raged overhead, the nation’s women were urged to salvage metal for the war effort. But was it just propaganda?

Daniel Ellsberg being presented with a papier-mâché ‘Declassified’ stamp on 23 September 1971, at a banquet held by the Federal Employees for Peace.

Revelations about the US nuclear codes during the Cold War from the man who helped draft the policy. 

Reconciliation: a heart garden planted during the Indian Residential Schools Truth  and Reconciliation Commission,  3 June 2015. (Press Association Images/Sean Kilpatrick)

Canada’s treatment of its indigenous peoples has been described as ‘cultural genocide’.

In late 1945, a small self-styled fascist church established itself in southern England, where its members worshipped Adolf Hitler. For the war-weary locals, it was too much: vigilante action was required.