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City by the sea: a view of Lisbon, 1548, Spanish woodcut.

A readable history of the Portuguese capital emphasises the modern at the expense of the city’s deeper past. 

Mikhail Gorbachev and Kazakh president Nursultan Nazarbayev.

Mikhail Gorbachev’s Perestroika triggered an outpouring of resentment across the USSR. In 1986, young Kazakhs made their voices heard, but the Soviet regime was not ready to listen.

Indian suffrage campaigners on the Women’s Coronation Procession, London, 1911.

Britain was neither the first country, nor the last, to give women the vote. It was one part of a global movement.

Marie Schmolka’s identity card.

Female volunteers such as Marie Schmolka played a decisive role in the collaborative project to rescue beleaguered Jewish children.

Helen McCarthy.

‘People can surprise you. They often don’t fit into the categories we impose on them.’

For most of history, different peoples, cultures and religious groups have lived according to their own calendars. Then, in the 11th century, a Persian scholar attempted to create a single, universal timeline for all humanity. 

Miniature of woman reading, from the Chronicles of the King of France, by Robert Gaguin, Paris, 1514.

An increasingly powerful state was made possible by the creation of archival networks.

A new life: a moorish woman in Granada, from Christoph Weiditz’s Trachtenbuch, 1530s.

A previously unnamed slave in Catherine of Aragon’s bedchamber may have known the answer to one of history’s greatest questions.

The ‘C Room’ in the Members’ Library.

For 200 years, the House of Commons Library has guided politicians and policy.

During the First World War, while politicians prevaricated, Romania’s British queen lobbied for entry on the side of the Allies and courted the international press, becoming the glamorous face of her adopted country’s war effort.