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The '35th' Gutenberg Bible, from the collection of the Library of Congress.

The story of a Gutenberg Bible, from 15th century Mainz to Keio University, Tokyo.

British concentration camp for the internment of insurgent Boers. Illustration by Jean Veber, from L’Assiette au Beurre, 1901 © Ullstein bild/Getty Images

Even for Nazi camp survivors who sought to eradicate them, they were hard to define.

Winston Churchill speaking in London, 23 February 1949.

How important is the study of the powerful, epoch-defining individual?

Hostile environment: ‘Furthest South’, September 1915 by Frank Hurley © Royal Geographical Society/Getty Images

The Southern Ocean was the last quadrant of the globe to be ‘discovered’ by Europeans.

Saint of female learning: Catherine of Alexandria, by Onorio Marinari, c.1670 © Wallace Collection, London/Bridgeman Images

We should take more notice of the work of those once despised and disregarded.

A scene of feasting, c.1594, Ottoman Empire © Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas/Bridgeman Images

A celebrated dish of the Ottoman Empire that spread far and wide.

Augusta and Adeline Van Buren, pictured in the New-York Tribune, March 18, 1917. Library of Congress.

Augusta and Adeline Van Buren arrived in Los Angeles on 8 September 1916 

Occupying British troops march past the Nusretiye mosque in Istanbul in 1920, as the Ottoman Empire collapses.

Across the Balkans, relics of Ottoman glory and decline, such as mosques, bridges and hamams, exist in various states of disrepair. Can they be brought back to life?

Ernest Bevin as Foreign Secretary, August 1945 © Popperfoto/Getty Images

A remarkable political career suggests that social mobility is of benefit to us all.

September Quiz

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