Head to Head

'Bring Out Your Dead': A street during the Great Plague in London, 1665, with a death cart and mourners. Wellcome Collection.

Can we learn from history about how diseases spread, and how we respond to them?

Nazi uniforms at the Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin. Wiki Commons / Richard Mortel.

The history of the Third Reich remains as popular as ever. Why?

Crowd in front of the Piercy Roberts window in London Caricature Shop, 1801. Rijksmuseum.

Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms are widely used by historians. But does anyone benefit?

A satire on the coronation of Napoleon: 'The Imperial Coronation', Thomas Rowlandson, 1804. Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Shedding past light on recent royal scandal, four historians consider the future of an ancient institution.

The Money Changers, Marinus van Reymerswaele (follower of), c. 1548. Wiki Commons.

When we ask historians which genre of history they like least, the most common answer is ‘economic’. Is the field unjustly maligned?

Saint George and the Dragon, Luca Signorelli (workshop of), 1495-1505. Rijksmuseum.

In an age when nationalism is on the rise, the role of the historian becomes ever more valuable – and controversial.

The Execution of Charles I, c.1649.

There has been no shortage of historical events put forward to explain Britain’s current political crisis, but do any of them seriously inform debate?

Winston Churchill speaking in London, 23 February 1949.

How important is the study of the powerful, epoch-defining individual?

Battle of Wilson's Creek, 10th August 10, 1861 (c.1893)

What did the violence in the bloodiest conflict in US history yield in the postwar era?

The Course of Empire: Destruction by Thomas Cole

Empires have been part of human history for millennia. Are they, of necessity, a bad thing?