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Anglo-Irish relations: Henry authorises Dermot to levy forces in 1170, from J.W.E. Doyle's A Chronicle of England, BC55 to AD 1485 (1863). (Bridgeman Images)
In the first of a new series, we ask historians one of the burning questions of the day.

History Today

The site of the disaster.
The rupture of a giant molasses tank in Boston just after the First World War caused devastation and led to the longest legal case in the city’s history.

Chuck Lyons

Wall painting of a bird in a garden, Pompeii, first century AD.

The role birds played in the lives – intellectual, practical, emotional and otherwise – of men and women in the ancient world. 

Mathew Lyons

Miscellanies is our free weekly long read.
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Lithograph of Kandahar by Lieutenant James Rattray, 1848.

The story of Afghanistan from the 13th century until the present illuminates why the international intervention that began in 2001 failed to deliver.

A life examined: Rosalind Franklin, c.1950.

Rosalind Franklin’s work was pivotal to one of the 20th century’s greatest scientific discoveries.

Flag of the United States of America with 34 stars, made of wool and cotton by Mrs John E. Forbes, 1861-63.

A wise and readable narrative history of the United States is a reminder of how tenaciously previous generations have clung to the view that the country is the ‘last, best hope of earth’.

Michael Scott.

‘The most common misconception about my field is that classicists study a past that no longer impacts on our world today.’

O Captain!: Wilhelm Voigt as  drawn by Ernst Kellermann in Simplicissimus, 12 January 1906.

Germany is the country most closely associated with militarism, but Britain has had its militarist moments, too.

Diane Atkinson Travels Through Time

In this episode of Travels Through Time historian and author, Diane Atkinson, takes us onto the streets and into the homes of Britain’s most militant suffragettes. 

The staple dish of the Middle East is as contested as the region, with different peoples claiming it as their own.

When the Cuban Revolution succeeded in January 1959, Fidel Castro had a problem: he was 550 miles from Havana. Undeterred, the would-be leader turned his journey to the capital into a victory march.

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Current Issue

Cover of the January issue

Volume 69 Issue 1 January 2019

  • America: the last empire
  • Why the British know so little about Irish history 
  • The conquest of Mexico
  • How to champion democracy
  • Behind bars in Victorian England
  • 17th-century medical care
  • Iran and the ‘Old Enemy’

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