Feature

Good as Gold

The absence of formal government on the American frontier emboldened miners to take powers usually reserved to the state, subjecting criminals to their own brand of vigilante justice. 

The Other Elizabeth

Emulating her godmother, Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Stuart captured hearts and minds as Europe burned. 

The Hogen Mogen Princess

Dismissed as ‘high and mighty’ and accused of pushing Charles I towards civil war, Henrietta Maria was a deft military mover – perhaps more so than the king himself.

The Unbreakable City

The Battle of Stalingrad began in August 1942, subjecting its residents to months of living hell. But few doubted that the city was worth defending; its significance to the Soviet project made it too important to abandon.

Violent Ends

Early modern methods of execution were carefully calculated to inflict shame upon the condemned. 

Law of the Land

What relevance do the Norman Conquest and the events of 1066 have to contemporary British politics? Everything and nothing.

Prince Darab’s Lost Treasure

Fleeing his father’s empire, an Afghan prince travelled from Kabul to Sindh via Mecca, becoming a fugitive, courtier and pilgrim in the process.

Love on the Wire

The advent of telecommunications gave rise to a new literary genre through which female telegraphers and writers found social freedoms.

The Normans in Byzantium

Spreading east in the 11th century, the Normans soon became a feared part of the Byzantine army, but a mercenary’s loyalty is always to his paymaster, as the empire would soon discover. 

On the Ballot

Before the secret ballot, voting in Britain was a theatrical, violent and public affair. The Act that made democracy private turns 150 this year.