Feature

Hindus burn the bodies  of co-religionists who have died of starvation,  at Calcutta’s Myrone Memorial, 1943 © William Vandivert/LIFE/Getty Images

Starvation and disease killed millions in British India during the Second World War. Why?

Lucius Cary, 2nd Viscount Falkland, by Anthony Van Dyck, 1641. Collection of the Duke of Devonshire, Chatsworth House, Derbyshire/Bridgeman Images

In an age of political and religious division that ended in Civil War, Lucius Cary and his circle at Great Tew offered a space for debate and compromise.

Women (and child) at a Ku Klux Klan mass-initiation ceremony, Atlanta, Georgia,  18 June 1949 © Getty Images

The role of women in the Ku Klux Klan is often neglected, but they were key players at all levels.

Margaret Thatcher and Conservative  Party Chairman Cecil Parkinson, celebrating the Conservative election victory, 9 June 1983 © Getty Images

Assessing Margaret Thatcher’s premiership: a radical decade and a divisive legacy. 

A detail from The Garden of Earthly Delights, by Hieronymus Bosch, 1490-1500 © Bridgeman Images

Despite the religious rupture caused by the Reformation, fear of the Apocalypse remained common to both sides of western Christendom. But older, classical ideas of an eternal return were at work, too.

A detail from a ‘balneological’ page from the Voynich Manuscript © akg-images

Despite recent claims, the Voynich Manuscript remains one of history’s biggest mysteries. 

German soldiers look out over Riga’s old town from the tower of St Peter’s Church, 1917 © Bridgeman Images

Events in the Baltic States at the end of the First World War had serious long-term consequences.

Abraham von Kiduna received by the host of a brothel, German woodcut, 1477.

What was life like for medieval prostitutes? A case in the German town of Nördlingen reveals a hellish world of exploitation and violence.

Berliners on the outskirts of Tempelhof Airfield during the airlift, July 1948.

Just two years after victory in the most murderous war in history, the divisions between the Soviet Union and the Western powers became unbridgeable. 

Late 16th century portrait, housed in the National Portrait Gallery, London.

The story of Richard III’s lieutenants, William Catesby, Sir Richard Ratcliffe and Francis, Viscount Lovell, is one of intrigue, death and a mysterious disappearance.