Feature

The Saracens besiege a Christian city, detail from The Song of Saint Mary, 1221-84 Photo © Luisa Ricciarini/Bridgeman Images.

Acre was the most cosmopolitan city in the medieval world. Its inhabitants thought it too valuable to destroy. They were wrong.

Mahomed’s Baths on Brighton seafront, c.1820 © Hulton Getty Images.

Shampooing was brought to Britain by a Bengali immigrant who knew his craft – and how to sell it.

View of Hampton Court, by Leonard Knyff, c.1702. Royal Collection Trust © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2020/Bridgeman Images.

Stately homes surrounded by extravagant gardens are a staple of the English countryside, but how were they funded?

The Slave Hunter,  by Jean-Baptiste  Debret, 19th century © Bridgeman Images.

Europeans did not introduce slavery to North America – although they did change the way it was practised.

Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg in La Dolce Vita, 1960. Still from La Dolce Vita (Pathé, 1960). Directed by Federico Fellini. Produced by Giuseppe Amato and Angelo Rizzoli. Cinematography by Otello Martelli. Photo © John Kobal Foundation/Getty.

Love and possession during the Italian economic miracle.

Murder Mystery

The most powerful family of Florence and the most powerful man in the world offer a new solution to one of the most notorious crimes of the age.

An illustration of a hysterical patient, from Les Maladies épidémiques de l’esprit, by Paul-Marie Léon Regnard, 1884 © Bridgeman Images.

A Victorian doctor offering to cure female ‘lunacy’ came under fire for his scandalous new operation: female genital mutilation.

Adolf Hitler and Joseph Goebbels  at a campaign  rally, Berlin Sports Palast, 31 November 1933 © Bettmann/Getty Images.

On 1 January 1933, Germany was a democracy with a range of political parties. By the end of the year its parliament was a rubber stamp for Adolf Hitler’s will.

 Field Marshal Sir Jeffery Amherst, by Joshua Reynolds, 1765 © Bridgeman Images.

Three lives from Britain’s 18th-century global empire speak of collaboration, resistance and ambivalence.

The Edge of Doom, by Samuel Colman, 1836-38 Bequest of Laura L Barnes © Bridgeman Images.

Science and superstition collided when an apocalypse was predicted to strike the United States in December 1919.