This Month's Magazine

October Issue

In the October issue:

  • Beyond Good and Evil
  • The Poet Who Saw Edith Cavell Die
  • Holy Women and the Rise of Royal Power in France
  • The Great Dictators
  • A Spiritual Wilderness
  • Who's Afraid of the Jazz Monster
  • A History of Chop Suey

You can buy this issue from our website or at newsagents across the United Kingdom from 19 September. You can also subscribe or read it as a digital edition via the History Today App.

Selected articles from this issue

The Execution of Charles I, c.1649.

There has been no shortage of historical events put forward to explain Britain’s current political crisis, but do any of them seriously inform debate?

August 1967: Police clash with protestors at the Hong Kong tram workers strike. Wiki Commons.

Hong Kong’s current extradition law crisis is not the first that the territory has faced.

Jackson Street, San Francisco’s Chinatown, 1962 © Bridgeman Images

A dish which arrived with the Gold Rush, spread with the railway and endured prohibition was Chinese by origin, but claimed by America.

Augustus Closing the Temple  of Janus, by Louis de Silvestre, 1757, Gemäldegalerie, Dresden © akg-images

Rome’s First Citizen brings peace to its territories.

Friedrich Nietzsche, by Edvard Munch, c.1906. © Munch Museet, Oslo, Norway/Bridgeman Images

As a frontline soldier in the First World War, the German artist Otto Dix fell under the spell of the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche and his assault on Christian morality.

Edith Cavell, c.1910 © Getty Images

How did an executed English nurse become the unlikely protector of the German poet who pronounced her dead?

Nativity, from the Psalter of Ingeborg of Denmark, c.1210 © Bridgeman Images

Medieval French monarchs used – and abused – the charismatic power of religious women.

Propaganda poster, c.1970 © Getty Images

What do the tyrants of the 20th century have in common? Terror, confusion and quasi-religious followings.

Plate 38, from 'World in Miniature', 1816, Thomas Rowlandson. Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In the Victorian countryside, what did going to church on Sundays actually mean?

Chinese officers tear down the British flag on the arrow, 8 October 1856.

On 8 October 1856, a British flagged Chinese vessel was seized and the Second Opium War began.

King Oliver and his Creole Jazz Band, Chicago, 1923, showing Louis Armstrong and his wife, Lil Hardin © Gilles Petard/Redferns/Getty Images

For many Americans, jazz was the music of demons, devils and things that go bump in the night.

The Battle of the Casino dei Quattro Venti During the Siege of Rome, by Carl Friedrich Heinrich, 1849 © Bridgeman Images

The little-known republic was a short-lived experiment in constitutional democracy.

Salvador Allende, Senator of Chile’s Socialist Party, at a solidarity rally for the  Cuban revolution, 1962 © Getty Images

Latin America conjures up images of constant political turmoil, powered by endless revolutions. But this is misleading.

Reliquary bust of Charlemagne, 1349 © Bridgeman Images

A new book presents an account of Charlemagne, year by year, without hindsight.

Potosi, from a Map of South America, London c.1715

Potosí’s fame came not only from its wealth, but also its notoriety for appalling working conditions.

England play Hungary at Wembley Stadium in 1953 © Hulton Getty Images

Many of the ideas that shape football today were developed in the 1920s by a generation of Hungarian coaches.

Boney bringing home the truth from Spain (Satire on the Peninsular War), 7 September 1808. Library of Congress

How a government-sponsored network of civilian agents complemented Wellington's own intelligence gathering.

Erotic fresco from the lupanar, Pompeii, first century AD. Photo by Frédéric Soltan © Getty Images

The largest of Pompeii's legalised Lupanars is the only surviving ‘purpose-built’ Roman brothel.

Immovable object? Hoa Hakanai’a on display in the British Museum. Photo: James Miles/Wikimedia/Creative Commons.

History tells us that, in order to prosper, civilisations must embrace change.

Justin Marozzi

What’s the most important lesson history has taught me? That we learn nothing from it.

Bodleian Library, Oxford: Duke Humfrey's library with a man studying (detail). Frederick Mackenzie, 1787. Wellcome Collection.

What happened when a historian took the ‘Life in the UK’ test for British citizenship?