This Month's Magazine

September 2019

In the September issue:

  • Himmler's Witch Hunt
  • Life on the Mississippi
  • Keeping India Cool
  • Enemies of the Habsburgs
  • History in Ruins
  • History of Borek
  • The Beard Maketh the Man
  • What Counts as a Concentration Camp?

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Selected articles from this issue

Winston Churchill speaking in London, 23 February 1949.

How important is the study of the powerful, epoch-defining individual?

Ben Jones

Public monuments have become sites of historical conflict, revealing bitter divisions over interpretations of the past.

A scene of feasting, c.1594, Ottoman Empire © Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas/Bridgeman Images

A celebrated dish of the Ottoman Empire that spread far and wide.

Oedipus and Antigone, or the Plague of Thebes, by Charles Jalabert, 1843, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Marseille © Bridgeman Images

A pitiless, profound and influential Greek myth.

Karl Wolff, Heinrich Himmler and Reinhard Heydrich attend the premiere of the film Verräter (Traitor), Nuremberg, 1936 © akg-images

The Third Reich’s obsession with a pure Germanic past led to a renewed interest in the witch hunts of early modern Germany.

Race of the Steamboats: Robert E. Lee (nicknamed the ‘Monarch of the Mississippi’) and Natchez, chromolithograph, 1870 © Getty Images

Mark Twain painted an evocative vision of the Mississippi River, but he didn’t tell the whole story.

Three Indian men on a verandah pulling punkha strings, c.1900 © Royal Society for Asian Affairs, London/Bridgeman Images

Sweltering British imperialists relied on an army of fan bearers, whose stories are as invisible as the air they circulated.

Louis XIV after Charles Le Brun,17th century © Bridgeman Images

An alliance between Louis XIV and a Transylvanian prince was just one aspect of the Sun King’s ambition to dominate Europe.

Interior view of Coucy, 1890 © Roger-Viollet/Getty Images

The changing fates of one of France’s grandest castles are a microcosm for its history.

Augusta and Adeline Van Buren, pictured in the New-York Tribune, March 18, 1917. Library of Congress.

Augusta and Adeline Van Buren arrived in Los Angeles on 8 September 1916 

British concentration camp for the internment of insurgent Boers. Illustration by Jean Veber, from L’Assiette au Beurre, 1901 © Ullstein bild/Getty Images

Even for Nazi camp survivors who sought to eradicate them, they were hard to define.

'The fourth age'. Detail from a photo montage of the Members of the International Medical Congress, London, 1881. Wellcome Collection.

During the Renaissance, the beard was the defining feature of a man.

William Maxwell Aitken, Lord Beaverbrook. Caricature by Paolo Garretto for The Graphic, 3 March 1928 © Illustrated London News/Mary Evans Picture Library

Beaverbrook’s radical vision and prominent platform gave him enormous political sway.

Spreading the word: Louis carrying the Sceptre and Hand of Justice from Registre des Ordonnances de l’Hôtel du Roi, c.1320

For Louis, the conversion of Muslims to Christianity, ideally by peaceful means, was important. 

Waltham Abbey, Essex, c.1840, Peter De Wint. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Exploring Essex beyond the stereotypes.

The '35th' Gutenberg Bible, from the collection of the Library of Congress.

The story of a Gutenberg Bible, from 15th century Mainz to Keio University, Tokyo.

Hitler addresses the German nation, 30 January 1933.

Two new biographies advance our understanding of the Ultima Thule in evil.

Hostile environment: ‘Furthest South’, September 1915 by Frank Hurley © Royal Geographical Society/Getty Images

The Southern Ocean was the last quadrant of the globe to be ‘discovered’ by Europeans.

Detail from the Dantan family tomb, sculpture by Antoine Laurent Dantan, Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris. Glenn Harper/Alamy

Catacombs, cemeteries and the dead as a revolutionary force.

Ernest Bevin as Foreign Secretary, August 1945 © Popperfoto/Getty Images

A remarkable political career suggests that social mobility is of benefit to us all.

Roger Moorhouse

Which moment would I most like to go back to? Berlin at the end of the First World War.

Saint of female learning: Catherine of Alexandria, by Onorio Marinari, c.1670 © Wallace Collection, London/Bridgeman Images

We should take more notice of the work of those once despised and disregarded.