This Month's Magazine

Cover of the October issue
Cover of the October issue

In our October issue:

  • Divided loyalties in Tudor England
  • Lord Liverpool, Eurosceptic
  • Recycling to win the Second World War
  • Mesopotamia: the land between two rivers
  • The end of the English republic
  • St George and the Dragon

You can buy this issue from our website or at newsagents across the United Kingdom (find your nearest stockist) from 20 September. You can also subscribe or read it as a digital edition via the History Today App.

There's also a Spotify playlist to accompany the issue, featuring songs inspired by the magazine's contents:

 

Selected articles from this issue

Stock in trade: an advertisement for pot-au-feu beef cubes, illustration by Severo Pozzati (Sepo), 1957.

The story of the ‘mythical centre’ of French cuisine reflects the triumphs and tribulations of its people. 

Saint George and the Dragon, by Paolo Uccello, c.1470.

A medieval myth with deep roots that captured the imagination of western Europe’s age of chivalry.

Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn Observed by Queen Katherine (1870), by Marcus Stone.

For the lesser-known members of the great Tudor dynasties, loyalties were divided. Should you support your king, queen or family?

Detail from A Brothel Converted to  a Convent by Jan Milíč  of Kroměříž’, from the Slav Epic, by Alphonse Marie Mucha, 1916.

The modern belief that the Middle Ages was a time of ignorance and superstition means that we often end up believing fantastic stories, too, as the tale of a Czech preacher and his emperor demonstrates.

Robert  Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool, portrait by Thomas Lawrence, 1820.

The prime minister at the time of Napoleon’s defeat was a keen observer of European politics. His government sought a balance of power on the Continent, but with minimal British engagement.

US Marines evacuating wounded comrades, Kut al-Amara, 3 April 2003. (Gilles Bassignac/Gamma-Rapho, Paris)

Two imperial ventures, in the same Middle East town a century apart, reveal the similarities – and differences – in the exercise of power.

As the Battle of Britain raged overhead, the nation’s women were urged to salvage metal for the war effort. But was it just propaganda?

View of Ancient Babylon, Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach, 1721.

The two rivers where civilisation began.

José Luis Bustamante y Rivero, c.1940s

The rise and fall of José Luis Bustamante’s left-wing presidency.

Compositeur fantastique: Hector Berlioz, by Pierre Petit, c.1860.

The power and perils of reconstructing the music of Napoleon's time.

The national campaign for suffrage saw women forming societies from Land’s End to John O’Groats.

Rise and fall: Cromwell Dissolving the Long Parliament, by Benjamin West (1782).

The English republic was brought down by the same forces that brought it to power.

Bronze relief panel from the Gutenberg Monument in Mainz, by David d’Angers, 1840.

How one of the greatest advances in human culture also helped divide Christendom.  

Interior of the Mezquita-Catedral de Córdoba, Spain.

A history of medieval Iberia that reaches beyond simply a tale of Convivencia and Reconquista.

Queen Charlotte by Allan Ramsay.

Three German-born princesses made important contributions to the art, medicine and science of Georgian Britain.

Opium poppy, white flowers and seed capsule, about 1853, after Miss M.A. Burnett.

Opium has been known and used for more than 7,000 years. A brilliantly researched and wide-ranging study brings its history up to date.