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Ben Jones

Public monuments have become sites of historical conflict, revealing bitter divisions over interpretations of the past.

William Maxwell Aitken, Lord Beaverbrook. Caricature by Paolo Garretto for The Graphic, 3 March 1928 © Illustrated London News/Mary Evans Picture Library

Beaverbrook’s radical vision and prominent platform gave him enormous political sway.

Detail from the Dantan family tomb, sculpture by Antoine Laurent Dantan, Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris. Glenn Harper/Alamy

Catacombs, cemeteries and the dead as a revolutionary force.

Oedipus and Antigone, or the Plague of Thebes, by Charles Jalabert, 1843, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Marseille © Bridgeman Images

A pitiless, profound and influential Greek myth.

Interior view of Coucy, 1890 © Roger-Viollet/Getty Images

The changing fates of one of France’s grandest castles are a microcosm for its history.

Louis XIV after Charles Le Brun,17th century © Bridgeman Images

An alliance between Louis XIV and a Transylvanian prince was just one aspect of the Sun King’s ambition to dominate Europe.

Hitler addresses the German nation, 30 January 1933.

Two new biographies advance our understanding of the Ultima Thule in evil.

'The fourth age'. Detail from a photo montage of the Members of the International Medical Congress, London, 1881. Wellcome Collection.

During the Renaissance, the beard was the defining feature of a man.

Karl Wolff, Heinrich Himmler and Reinhard Heydrich attend the premiere of the film Verräter (Traitor), Nuremberg, 1936 © akg-images

The Third Reich’s obsession with a pure Germanic past led to a renewed interest in the witch hunts of early modern Germany.

Race of the Steamboats: Robert E. Lee (nicknamed the ‘Monarch of the Mississippi’) and Natchez, chromolithograph, 1870 © Getty Images

Mark Twain painted an evocative vision of the Mississippi River, but he didn’t tell the whole story.