Volume 62 Issue 6 June 2012

A public spat between a historian and a writer shows why some subject matter deserves special reverence, says Tim Stanley.

Roger Hudson on a moment in the story of Scottish emigration captured in 1923.

The pioneer of English travel writing was born on June 7th, 1662.

The boxer's great victory over James J. Braddock took place on June 22nd, 1937.

Richard Cavendish remembers the royal favourite who died on June 19th, 1312.

The pioneer of English travel writing was born on June 7th, 1662.

The boxer's great victory over James J. Braddock took place on June 22nd, 1937.

Richard Cavendish remembers the royal favourite who died on June 19th, 1312.

In the Middle Ages, with the re-emergence of Salic Law, it became impossible for women to succeed to the throne in most European kingdoms. Yet between 1274 and 1512 five queens ruled the Pyrenean kingdom of Navarre, as Elena Woodacre tells their stories.

As London gears up for the start of the Olympics next month, David Runciman compares the 2012 games with the London Olympics of 1908 and 1948 to see what they reveal about the changing relationship between politics and sport over the last century.

As Elizabeth II celebrates 60 years on the throne, Ian Bradley looks at the fundamentally religious nature of monarchy and the persistence of its spiritual aspects in a secular age.

In the summer of 1941 a collection of paintings by serving members of the London Fire Brigade  was exhibited in the United States. Anthony Kelly describes the success of a little-known propaganda campaign celebrating Britain’s ‘spirit of civilian heroism’.

Nicola Phillips reports from a recent London conference that looked at the ways in which new technology is changing local and family history.

Jonathan Fenby on the long history behind the rapid demise of one of the brightest lights in China’s political firmament.

Chris Millington says we shouldn’t be surprised by the Front national’s show of strength in the recent French elections.

Jonathan Fenby on the long history behind the rapid demise of one of the brightest lights in China’s political firmament.

As a boy growing up in Munich Edgar Feuchtwanger witnessed the rise of Germany’s dictator at extraordinarily close range.

Commentators repeat with regularity the claim that the Queen’s greatest achievement, besides simple longevity, is her modernisation of the monarchy. But, says Dan Jones, she still owes a great deal to her medieval predecessors.

Nicholas Mee recalls Jeremiah Horrocks, the first astronomer to observe Venus cross in front of the Sun, whose discoveries paved the way for the achievements of Isaac Newton.

Marilyn V. Longmuir asks if Aung San Suu Kyi’s recent election victory completes the political journey begun by her father?

The wars of 1839-42 and 1856-60 are a perfect case study of the divergence of opinion that the British Empire continues to generate.

Over the next four issues we will be looking at the history of the British Isles by examining its former and present constituent parts – Wales, Scotland, Ireland and, finally, England. This month Hywel Williams writes about Wales.

From Captain Cook to playboy Prince Bertie, Tessa Dunlop examines the appeal of the tattoo among high society.

Keith Lowe argues that in history, there is no weapon quite so powerful as a good statistic.