From the Editor

The philosopher Thomas Hobbes in 1676 Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire. English, 17th century.

Historians should remind themselves that quantity and quality are often very different things.

Lorenzetti’s Allegory of Good Government. Rafaello Bencini/Bridgeman Images.

A warning housed in one of the jewels of the Italian Renaissance is as pertinent now as ever.

Edward VI, by Guillaume Scrots, c.1550 © Bridgeman Images.

Decent popular history would be impossible without the scholarly endeavours of the academy.

Claims to civilisation: Michael Howard © Avalon Licensing.

No one understood the literary dimension of conflict better than Michael Howard.

The new sign marking the permanent ban on climbing Uluru © Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images.

The global struggle to resist the banalities of mass tourism.

Shuttlecocks and Mackerel, or Members Going to Vote on the Corn Bill, 14 March 1815, by George Cruikshank © Bridgeman Images.

A troubled UK is in desperate need of politicians and commentators who can think historically.

Immovable object? Hoa Hakanai’a on display in the British Museum. Photo: James Miles/Wikimedia/Creative Commons.

History tells us that, in order to prosper, civilisations must embrace change.

Ernest Bevin as Foreign Secretary, August 1945 © Popperfoto/Getty Images

A remarkable political career suggests that social mobility is of benefit to us all.

Lambert’s Lily: Nerine sarniensis, illustration by Pancrace Bessa, 1820. © Bridgeman Images

An English Arcadia and an enduring struggle.

Storied life: Zsa Zsa Gabor with her poodle, Farouk, c.1960 © Ed Clark/LIFE/Getty Images

What connects a Hollywood star, a physicist of genius and a recently departed historian?