Volume 64 Issue 4 April 2014

The society lady was born in Piccadily on April 23rd, 1814.

In their celebrated spoof history, 1066 and All That , Sellar and Yeatman famously concluded that English history contained only two memorable dates: 1066 itself and the year 55 BC (when Caesar invaded Britain, if memory serves). But there can be little doubt, given their choice of title, that they thought the Norman Conquest of 1066 was the most memorable of all.

Henry V's right-hand man was made Archbishop on April 27th, 1414.

The Irish ruler met a bloody fate on April 23rd, 1014.

Henry V's right-hand man was made Archbishop on April 27th, 1414.

The Irish ruler met a bloody fate on April 23rd, 1014.

John Henderson challenges received ideas on how medieval and early modern societies dealt with perils such as plague.

The strangeness of the past can be evoked more effectively in pick and mix fantasies than in those novels, films and TV dramas that aspire to realism, argues Suzannah Lipscomb.

It is the issue of Russian identity, rather than strategic or economic importance, that lies at the heart of the Crimean crisis, argues Alexander Lee

The legacy of the Crimean War still resonates in Ukraine, as Hugh Small explains.

The suffering of prisoners of war at the hands of the Japanese during the Second World War has coloured the British view of the conflict in the Far East. Clare Makepeace highlights a little known aspect of the captives’ story: their quest for compensation.

Jessie Childs recounts the chilling story of an exorcism performed in an Elizabethan household in Hackney.

Chris Wrigley explores the hugely beneficial impact of the First World War on the British tobacco industry and looks at how smoking became an approved symbol of comradeship and patriotism.

The turmoil in Ukraine has a strong religious dimension. Catherine Wanner asks if a common Christian heritage may yet help maintain relations with its Russian neighbour.

Roger Hudson takes a roadside view of the automobiles about to embark on the arduous, 22,000-mile journey.

The military potential of unmanned flying ‘drones’ is well known. But what about their use in archaeology?

There are striking parallels between state survelliance in the Tudor age and today.

The notorious malady of the 18th century is on the increase in the UK.

Robert Knecht revisits an article marking 400 years since the assassination of Henry III of France and asks why the last Valois king has attracted so little attention from English-speaking historians.

The military potential of unmanned flying ‘drones’ is well known. But what about their use in archaeology?

There are striking parallels between state survelliance in the Tudor age and today.

The notorious malady of the 18th century is on the increase in the UK.

Mother, sister, wife and lover and part of the Roman elite, Agrippina the Younger sought to escape the restrictions imposed on her sex.

London’s oldest extant market is celebrating its millennium.