History Today at Hatchards

Roger Moorhouse

The ‘Nazi who said sorry’ was a master of constructing his own narrative.

Führer fake: Hitler leaves what is not Landsberg Prison.

A 90-year-old photograph of the future dictator soon after leaving prison still manages to fool the world’s media outlets.

Roger Moorhouse tells the story of the Lützow, a partly built German cruiser delivered to the Soviet Union in 1940 and renamed the Petropavlovsk, following the Nazi-Soviet Pact of 1939.

In the event of a successful Nazi invasion of Britian, Adolf Hitler proposed rural Shropshire as his headquarters. Roger Moorhouse explores why he would have chosen such a location.

Antony Beevor, author of a new account of the Second World War, talks to Roger Moorhouse about the importance of narrative and why he thinks new technology is not the future for history in a post-literate age.

Albert Speer’s plan to transform Berlin into the capital of a 1,000-year Reich would have created a vast monument to misanthropy.

Roger Moorhouse revisits a perceptive article by John Erickson on the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union, first published in History Today in 2001, its insights born of a brief period of Russian openness.

A poster from 1939 appeals for donations in aid of winter relief for Berlin's Jews.

As the daily life of Berlin's Jews became even more difficult under the Nazi regime, rumour and hearsay grew about the fate of those 'evacuated' to the east. How much did ordinary Berliners know about the fate of their neighbours?