Rome and Carthage: A Gesture towards Peace

After Hannibal’s defeat by Scipio Africanus, writes Zvi Yavetz, Carthage tried for some fifty years to live in peace with Rome.

A marble bust, reputedly of Hannibal, originally found at the ancient city-state of Capua in Italy
A marble bust, reputedly of Hannibal, originally found at the ancient city-state of Capua in Italy

As I write (in November 1974), the peace conference on Israel is about to begin in Geneva. As a citizen of the state of Israel, I pray for it to succeed. As a man who has lost his entire family in the Nazi camps, who has lived under Soviet occupation and has experienced five wars in Israel, I should not have any difficulty in convincing anybody that my prayer for a genuine and lasting peace is sincere.

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