History Today

Reliquary bust of Charlemagne, 1349 © Bridgeman Images

A new book presents an account of Charlemagne, year by year, without hindsight.

Potosi, from a Map of South America, London c.1715

Potosí’s fame came not only from its wealth, but also its notoriety for appalling working conditions.

Jackson Street, San Francisco’s Chinatown, 1962 © Bridgeman Images

A dish which arrived with the Gold Rush, spread with the railway and endured prohibition was Chinese by origin, but claimed by America.

Salvador Allende, Senator of Chile’s Socialist Party, at a solidarity rally for the  Cuban revolution, 1962 © Getty Images

Latin America conjures up images of constant political turmoil, powered by endless revolutions. But this is misleading.

Richard, acting as Lord Protector, orders the arrest of William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings. From 'A Chronicle of England: B.C. 55 – A.D. 1485', c. 1864. Wiki Commons.

Our latest podcast looks at the rise and fall of the House of York in 1483.

Immovable object? Hoa Hakanai’a on display in the British Museum. Photo: James Miles/Wikimedia/Creative Commons.

History tells us that, in order to prosper, civilisations must embrace change.

Erotic fresco from the lupanar, Pompeii, first century AD. Photo by Frédéric Soltan © Getty Images

The largest of Pompeii's legalised Lupanars is the only surviving ‘purpose-built’ Roman brothel.

Chinese officers tear down the British flag on the arrow, 8 October 1856.

On 8 October 1856, a British flagged Chinese vessel was seized and the Second Opium War began.

Plate 38, from 'World in Miniature', 1816, Thomas Rowlandson. Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In the Victorian countryside, what did going to church on Sundays actually mean?

A Chinese teacher. Painting by a Chinese artist, ca. 1850. Wellcome Collection.

Who – or what – was Martha? What was founded by Octavia Hill in 1895?