History Today

Dustmen, drunkards and washerwomen: ‘Petition Mongers in full Cry to St Stephens!! Beware of Wolves in Sheeps Cloathing’, by Isaac Cruikshank, 1795.

What’s the point of petitions?

Illustration of Mary Walcott at the Salem witch trials.

Leading historians discuss one of the burning questions of the day.

Illustration by R. Fresson.

Having produced, directed and starred in a lascivious play, West was charged with ‘corrupting the morals of youth’ on 19 April 1927.

Untitled drawing by Nina Jirsikovà, 1941.

Periods are a fact of life, but little talked about. How did women in the concentration camps cope with the private being made public in the most dire and extreme circumstances?

Infantrymen of Japan’s Self-Defence Forces parading in Tokyo, 3 November 1966.

After a disastrous Second World War, Japan abolished its armed forces and embraced pacifism. With renewed tensions in East Asia, can it last?

‘The Bath’, from Valerius Maximus’ Facta et dicta memorabilia, 15th century, French.

In the medieval period you could touch the divine – and smell it, see it, hear it and taste it, sometimes all at once.

The oldest complete copy of Euclid’s The Elements, Greek, by Stephanos the Clerk, AD 888.

The medieval world was incredibly learned, but how did its great bank of knowledge spread – from Classical Greece to the libraries of the East and from there to the bookshelves of England?

Skinheads, Piccadilly Circus, 1969.

Teenagers were agents of change in 1960s Britain, but the birth of youth movements such as the Mods was heavily indebted to the multicultural society from which they grew.

A man being flogged in the wake of the Amritsar Massacre, 1919.

Was the massacre of April 1919 a symptom of British oppression, or an exceptional event?

Prolix puritan: Richard Baxter, engraving on a 19th-century bookplate.

William (‘Willie’) Lamont (1934-2018) changed our understanding of religion and the civil war.