Volume 65 Issue 6 June 2015

From sausage-sellers to suffragettes, questioning and puncturing our political leaders through satire has been essential for democracy ever since comedy was born in Ancient Greece, argues Edith Hall.

Wagner's opera was first performed in Munich on June 10th, 1865.

The artist died on June 1st, 1815.

The great conqueror took the Chinese city on June 1st, 1215.

Andrew Roberts is both entertained and stimulated by Felix Markham’s 1963 article on Napoleon, which made judicious use of what correspondence was then available. 

Nigel Saul marks the 800th anniversary of the sealing of Magna Carta with a comprehensive overview of the landmark books that dominate the field.

Roger Hudson detailes how 122,000 French troops were evacuated from Dunkirk to Britain in May 1940. 

Larry Gragg investigates the evidence behind ‘Bugsy Siegels claim that he planned to kill the high-ranking Nazi in 1939.

Derek Wilson explores the Prebendaries Plot against Henry VIII’s reforming archbishop.

No Scottish clan is as controversial as the Campbells. Yet, says Ian Bradley, the opening of its Argyll Mausoleum offers a chance to re-assess a contentious past.

The ‘hands-on’ parenting style, so often thought to be unique to modern western society, has deep roots in the family life of the Middle Ages, argues Rachel Moss.

Marisa Linton explains how Jacques-Pierre Brissot helped to initiate the French revolutionary wars, as he and Robespierre debated whether conflict with Austria should be a ‘crusade for universal liberty’.

Andrew Stewart investigates the forgotten role of those ‘ideal soldiers of democracy’, troops from Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, who arrived to defend Britain from invasion.

An exhibition at the Bodleian Libraries, Oxford.

Before its untimely end this once great city was the centre of a vast and powerful civilisation.