Volume 64 Issue 2 February 2014

The Great War provided unprecedented opportunities for scientists, especially women.

Henry VIII’s masterful administrator and reformer forged an unlikely friendship with a prioress, as Mary C. Erler explains.

The playwright was baptised on February 26th, 1564.

Having conquered England, the Viking king died after a fall from his horse on February 3rd, 1014.

The playwright was baptised on February 26th, 1564.

Having conquered England, the Viking king died after a fall from his horse on February 3rd, 1014.

Jerome de Groot considers recent releases.

Julia Jones examines the career of Willem van de Velde the Elder, the first official war artist.

The desire to distinguish between the deserving and undeserving poor is nothing new, says David Filtness. The founder of the Thames Police, Patrick Colquhoun, was both radical and draconian in his approach to crime and Poor Law reform.

The newspaper was born when publishers in Protestant lands began to produce printed versions of the hand-written bulletins that had provided news for Europe’s elites. It was to prove a difficult birth, as Andrew Pettegree explains.

Roger Hudson explains a photographic panorama, taken at the beginning of the Second Afghan War, of the ancient and forbidding fortress of Bala Hissar.

Studying the 17th century reveals a lot about modern conceptions of toleration.

After reading an article first published in History Today in 2004, Jeremy Treglown is struck by how much more complex our view of the Spanish Civil War has become in just a decade. 

After reading an article first published in History Today in 2004, Jeremy Treglown is struck by how much more complex our view of the Spanish Civil War has become in just a decade. 

Jerome de Groot considers recent releases.

Studying the 17th century reveals a lot about modern conceptions of toleration.

Christopher Smith revels in reappraisals of both Augustus 2,000 years after his death and of Cleopatra, the so-nearly queen of Rome.

When he started researching the great era of Antarctic exploration, Chris Turney had no desire to add to the commentary on the deaths of Scott and his men. But, during his investigations, he stumbled across a new aspect of the story, with implications for the way the men’s memory is honoured.

Why do modern Britons still find it so hard to acknowledge their revolutionary past?

The Japanese ruler was laid to rest on February 24th, 1989.

Adopting the guise of a man was a path to influence for medieval women. It could be a dangerous one, too.

The elites of ancient Rome transformed the nature of hunting.

As interest in the Protector grows, the axe hangs over his former school.

Our conceptions of time have become more accurate but less personal, says Mathew Lyons.