Volume 63 Issue 8 August 2013

Modern paganism is an invented tradition, says Tim Stanley. So why is the Church of England offering it a helping hand?

The first (and indeed only) Welsh monarch was toppled on August 5th, 1063.

The Byzantine ruler claimed his throne on August 16th, 963.

The make-up master died on August 30th, 1938.

The first (and indeed only) Welsh monarch was toppled on August 5th, 1063.

The Byzantine ruler claimed his throne on August 16th, 963.

Established partly in response to the long-feared French invasion and partly to quell unrest at home, the yeomanry were increasingly used by the authorities to intervene on the side of employers in disputes and riots. The ensuing armed clashes present the clearest example of class warfare in early 19th-century Britain, says Nick Mansfield.  

The relationship between religion and rationality was an intimate one in 17th-century England. Christopher J. Walker looks at the arguments and controversies of the time, which helped to forge a more open society.

Large numbers of West Africans came to Britain to study in the postwar years. Many placed their children in the care of white, working-class families. Jordanna Bailkin describes how it was not just Britain’s diplomatic relationships that were transformed at the end of empire but also social and personal ones.

The collapse of the USSR after 1989 opened up Russia’s Arctic region to a degree of scrutiny previously denied historians. Katherine Harrison and Matthew Hughes examine the Soviet approach to nuclear testing.

The author of Whisky Galore played an active role in the Great War, experiencing both the horror of the Dardanelles in 1915 and the intrigues of wartime Athens. Yet his diplomatic ham-fistedness forced his premature exit. Richard Hughes explains. 

The persecution and execution of Jews in 15th-century Italy highlights the ambiguous attitudes of Renaissance intellectuals towards Jewish people, their beliefs and their historical relationship with Christian theology, as Stephen Bowd explains.

Roger Hudson tells the story behind a moment of violence in 1923 outside China's Forbidden City in Peking.

Adrian Mourby welcomes the return to public view of the Habsburgs’ esoterica.

It is time to ditch the Blackadder view of history, says Gary Sheffield. Britain was right to fight Imperial Germany in 1914.

Richard Kennett calls on his fellow history teachers to embrace narrative. There is no better way to inspire the historians of the future.

Kate Cooper reassesses Brent Shaw’s 1994 article on women in the early Church, which reveals a key historical principle.

Adrian Mourby welcomes the return to public view of the Habsburgs’ esoterica.

It is time to ditch the Blackadder view of history, says Gary Sheffield. Britain was right to fight Imperial Germany in 1914.

Richard Kennett calls on his fellow history teachers to embrace narrative. There is no better way to inspire the historians of the future.

Lady Margaret Douglas, a favourite of Henry VIII, negotiated the shady politics and shifting alliances of the courts of four Tudor monarchs. Leanda de Lisle tells the story of the ‘progenitor of princes’, whose grandson, James VI of Scotland, became the first Stuart king of England.

The recent killing of a French teenager by fascist sympathisers recalls the tensions and divisions of the 1930s, says Chris Millington.