Volume 63 Issue 1 January 2013

Roger Hudson expands on a photograph of Enoch Powell campaigning in his Wolverhampton seat in 1970.

In challenging times Britons seek comfort in a past that never existed. Tim Stanley shatters their illusions.

The recent introduction of police commissioners to England and Wales is supposed to bring the force closer to the people. But, asks Clive Emsley, where is the evidence for that?

The French poet was ordered to leave his city on January 3rd, 1463.

The bibliophile and founder of the Bodleian Library died on January 29th, 1613.

The capital went underground on January 10th, 1863.

The French poet was ordered to leave his city on January 3rd, 1463.

The bibliophile and founder of the Bodleian Library died on January 29th, 1613.

The capital went underground on January 10th, 1863.

In our latest survey of historical fiction Jerome de Groot finds a remarkable breadth of books that address our need for present-day certainties to confound the chaos of the past – and revisits a timeless classic.

Pilgrims were a lucrative source of income for the Church and miracles did not come free. Adrian Bell and Richard Dale discover some striking parallels with modern marketing tactics in the management of shrines in the Middle Ages.

Syrie Maugham was a businesswoman and beauty whose interior designs became a sensation on both sides of the Atlantic. However her relationships with a series of prominent men left her personal life in tatters. Frances Larson tells her story.

Tom Wareham examines the role played by a legendary yet ill-fated pirate in the consolidation of England’s early trading empire.

Inspired by his upbringing at the English court, Hákon I – nicknamed ‘Athelstan’s foster-son’ – strove to make Norway more like his mentor’s realm, a well-organised Christian kingdom. His reforms were to have a lasting impact, explains Synnøve Veinan Hellerud.

Hent Kalmo considers the roots of sovereignty and the changing basis determining the authority of a state to govern itself or another state at the expense of local or individual liberties.

The right to determine who enters its territory has always been seen as a test of a state’s sovereignty, but the physical boundaries have often been vague, says Matt Carr.

Nigel Watson celebrates 80 years of the British Interplanetary Society.

Hent Kalmo considers the roots of sovereignty and the changing basis determining the authority of a state to govern itself or another state at the expense of local or individual liberties.

The right to determine who enters its territory has always been seen as a test of a state’s sovereignty, but the physical boundaries have often been vague, says Matt Carr.

Nigel Watson celebrates 80 years of the British Interplanetary Society.

Lucy Inglis admires Nicholas Orme’s article on medieval childhood, first published in History Today in 2001.

Mark Ronan describes new efforts  at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, to decode the world’s oldest undeciphered language.

Postwar decolonisation in West Africa saw tensions rise between the fading imperial powers of France and Britain, according to papers recently unearthed by Kathryn Hadley.

Benjamin Ziemann examines the enigma of Karl Mayr, the reclusive army officer who nurtured Adolf Hitler’s early political career.