Volume 63 Issue 4 April 2013

We downplay terrible acts from the distant past, in a way that we never would when considering more recent crimes, says Tim Stanley.

The Spanish explorer landed in the New World on April 3rd, 1513.

While Antony and Cleopatra have been immortalised in history and in popular culture, their offspring have been all but forgotten. Their daughter, Cleopatra Selene, became an important ruler in her own right. 

Of the many immigrants from the United Kingdom who took up arms in the war, only a small number were English. 

The founder of the Baha'i religious movement proclaimed his vision on April 21st, 1863.

The great political philosopher was born on April 5th, 1588.

The founder of the Baha'i religious movement proclaimed his vision on April 21st, 1863.

The great political philosopher was born on April 5th, 1588.

Graham A. MacDonald reappraises the ideas and impact of the 20th-century political thinker, Michael Oakeshott.

Michelle Liebst looks at how the career of the great explorer of Africa reflects the wider failings of Victorian imperialism.

President Obama has more in common with Dwight D. Eisenhower than any other of his predecessors, says Michael Burleigh.

Yvonne Sherratt explores the ways in which Adolf Hitler attempted to appropriate the ideas of some of Germany’s greatest thinkers during his brief incarceration in 1924.

Roger Hudson explains a moment of panic on the streets of the newly liberated French capital.

Carol Dyhouse questions some of the assertions made by John Gardiner in his 1999 article about the Victorians.

The relationship between an ‘unquiet past’ and the concerns of the present has been a key feature of recent engagements with the Spanish Civil War, as Mary Vincent explains.

Exhuming historical characters makes for dramatic headlines and can seem a great way to get easy answers, but we should think twice before disturbing the remains of dead monarchs, says Justin Pollard.

John Gillingham challenges an idea, recently presented in History Today, that the Anglo-Saxon King Egbert was responsible for the naming of England.

The Oxford Dodo has defined our idea of the creature. When alive, the bird was displayed in London as part of a kind of urban freak show. In death it featured in Alice in Wonderland. Charles Norton reveals what became of the last dodo.

In 1943 a train was stopped by resisters as it travelled from Flanders to Auschwitz. Althea Williams tells the story of a survivor.

Derek Wilson looks at Henry Tudor’s long period of exile and asks what influence it had on his exercise of power following his seizure of the English throne in 1485.

This essay was the winner of the 2012 Julia Wood essay prize.

The founding of the great city by the Dutch, and other New York firsts.