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Volume 61 Issue 11 November 2011

The academic training that historians undergo qualifies them to speak out on issues beyond their remit, argues Tim Stanley.

The first performance of The Tempest on record was at court on All Hallows’ Day, on 1 November 1611.

The leading Victorian radical and Liberal politician John Bright was born on November 16th 1811.

Clovis I died in Paris on November 27th 511, aged 46.

The leading Victorian radical and Liberal politician John Bright was born on November 16th 1811.

Clovis I died in Paris on November 27th 511, aged 46.

Tim Grady on postwar Germany’s attempts to remember the contribution made by its Jewish combatants in the First World War.

Colin Jones and Emily Richardson reveal a little-known collection of obscene and irreverent 18th-century drawings targetting Madame de Pompadour, the favourite mistress of Louis XV of France.

Taylor Downing tells the story of the Central Interpretation Unit at Medmenham, Buckinghamshire, where the RAF’s aerial photo interpreters played a critical role in Britain’s wartime struggle.

A class confrontation at the Epsom Derby of 1920.

Anthony Fletcher pays tribute to the great historian of English protestantism, who ventured far and wide in the academic world.

Few figures in British political history have endured such lingering hostility as the statesman who did so much to forge Europe’s post-Napoleonic settlement, says John Bew.

Gated communities may be growing in number but they are nothing new, as Michael Nelson knows from personal experience.

Anne Sebba revisits Michael Bloch’s article, first published in History Today in 1979, on the historian Philip Guedalla’s enthusiastic but misguided support for his friend, Edward VIII.

At its height, the British Empire was the largest the world has ever known. Its history is central to Britain’s history, yet, as Zoë Laidlaw shows, this imperial past is not an easy narrative to construct.

Michael Bentley looks at the father of British historiography who was an eloquent and controversial opponent of teleology.

To mark the 400th anniversary of his birth, UNESCO has declared Evliya Çelebi a ‘man of the year’. His Seyahatname, or Book of Travels, is one of the world’s great works of literature. Caroline Finkel celebrates a figure little known in the West.

A political exile, Richard Wagner found safety in Zurich, where he also discovered the love and philosophy that inspired his greatest works, as Paul Doolan explains.

In recent years British models have reappeared on the catwalk wearing real fur, though it is unlikely to ever regain the mass appeal it once had. Carol Dyhouse looks back to a time when female glamour was defined by a mink coat.

Inspired by the discovery of the frozen bodies of three soldiers of the First World War, Peter Englund considers the ways we remember and write about a conflict of which there are now no survivors left.