Help for Heroes

Volume 56 Issue 5 May 2006

The man who ‘discovered’ the Americas died aged 55 on 20 May 1506.

The first US airdrop of a thermonuclear bomb happened on May 20th, 1956.

Richard Cavendish describes the massacre of the 'slave hounds' at the settlement of Pottawatomie Creek on May 24th, 1856.

The first US airdrop of a thermonuclear bomb happened on May 20th, 1956.

Richard Cavendish describes the massacre of the 'slave hounds' at the settlement of Pottawatomie Creek on May 24th, 1856.

Mike Huggins revisits the early years of British greyhound racing, the smart modern sports craze of interwar Britain.

Carmen Callil talks to Martin Evans about her recent excursion into the lies and hypocrisy of Vichy France.

Mark Bryant describes how the Daily Mail nearly became the first national daily in Britain to feature large political cartoons on its front page, fifteen years before Dyson’s huge drawings appeared in the Daily Herald.

Discovered during the French occupation but seized by the victorious British after six months of desert battle, the Rosetta Stone symbolized the struggle for cultural supremacy between two great rivals.

Martin Pugh revisits one of the most bitter disputes in history and assesses its impact on industrial relations and the wider political landscape of the twentieth century.  

Margaret Walsh tracks down an attempt to link the appeal of the greyhound with the brand values of a famous American company.

Kevin Haddick Flynn looks back at the life and times of radical Michael Davitt as Ireland remembers the centenary of his death on May 31st.

Philip Mansel recalls the creation of the kingdom of Belgium in 1831, in a successful act of co-operation between London, Paris and Brussels.

The Historical Association is celebrating its hundredth birthday. Keith Robbins appraises its past and present role in acting as the voice for ‘History’.

On May 21st, Montenegrins are being asked, in a long-delayed referendum, if they want to end their union with Serbia. James Evans explains the background to their momentous decision.

Civilians have always suffered in warfare, and Early Modern Europe was no exception. But they contributed to war as well, through their taxes, their victuals and their bodies. Jeremy Black explores the relationship between civilian and military.

Graham Gendall Norton introduces a city that has faced invasions and foreign adventures since Roman times.