Who's Who

Tudor

“The moving spirit” of the English Reformation, Cromwell incurred all the odium inseparable from the revolutionary changes that he helped to bring about. He was nevertheless, given his aims, a skilful and far-sighted statesman, writes G.R. Elton.

Lady Margaret Douglas, a favourite of Henry VIII, negotiated the shady politics and shifting alliances of the courts of four Tudor monarchs. Leanda de Lisle tells the story of the ‘progenitor of princes’, whose grandson, James VI of Scotland, became the first Stuart king of England.

An interactive guide to how the Tudors led to the Stuarts.

To most modern readers little more than a resounding name, the Kingmaker is here described by Paul Kendall as an “early exemplar of that Western European energy” which was presently to transform the civilized world.

Raymond Tong describes how Britain's connections with West Africa began four centuries ago, when Wyndham sailed to Benin in search of gold and pepper.

David Williams traces the Welsh heritage of England's greatest monarchy to medieval times and the Wars of the Roses.

Gordon Marsden appreciates the long and brilliant career of the great historian of Tudor Britain.

A.K.B Evans recounts the story behind the centre for the Knights of the Garter at Windsor, which was built by Edward IV in 1475.

Lansing Collins describes how, soon after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, a young Yorkshireman named Edward Barton was despatched to the Sultan’s court to promote the interests of the Levant Company.

L.W. Cowie explains how the Hansard merchants from northern Germany maintained their own Community in London from medieval times until 1852.

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