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On The Blog

Alternative Histories: Robert the Bruce on Rathlin Island

The Scottish patriot makes a surprising confession.

In the August issue of History Today

The outbreak of the First World War, the day Washington burned and the secret history of the Panama Canal.

The Black Prince and the Tour de France

The visitor to Leeds this summer may be surprised to see the Black Prince sporting the Maillot Jaune, usually worn by the leader of the Tour de France. Fortunately, there is a simple explanation.

Gallery: London's Bridges

Pictures of London's bridges, old and new.

The History Today Quiz: July 2014

This month's quiz includes questions on the Ottoman Empire, the Klondike Gold Rush and the Seven Years' War.

Reconstructing Baroque Opera

The recently opened Sam Wanamaker Theatre marks an intriguing step forward in the revival of baroque opera, says Mark Ronan. 

Alternative Designs for Tower Bridge

One of the world's most famous bridges turns 120 years old this week. But its distinctive design almost didn't come to pass.

Podcast: Africans in Georgian England

Onyeka joins us to introduce a number of aspiring Africans who made an impact on Georgian society during the 18th century.

In The Magazine

August 1914: The Shadows Lengthen

The Concert of Europe, the diplomatic model championed by Britain in the run-up to the First World War, was doomed by the actions of competing nationalisms. Britain’s entry into the conflict became inevitable, despite its lack of military preparation, as Vernon Bogdanor explains.

The Many and the Few: Augustus, Tiberius and Roman Ideals

T.P. Wiseman looks at how Roman republican ideals and the struggle between optimates and populares shaped the lives and legacies of the Roman imperator, Augustus, and his designated successor, Tiberius.

In Defence of Civilisation

Plans to remake the landmark BBC TV series raise challenging questions about contemporary pieties.

Ireland and the First World War

British historiography has been offered a once-in-a-generation opportunity to integrate Ireland’s contribution into analyses of the Great War, argues Catriona Pennell.

From Agincourt to Bosworth

Dan Jones argues that Nigel Saul’s article on Henry V and the union of the crowns of England and France does not take into account the long-term consequences of the king’s achievements.


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