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Dark Days: Prussia’s Winter of Discontent

For Germany's national identity, winter is a metaphor that keeps on giving.

Exhibition: Bletchley Park

A new visitor centre places the work of Bletchley Park within the broad history of the Second World War.

Ebola, Plague and Border Control

Few things instil as much terror as a deadly contagion with no known cure.

Podcast: General Sherman's Total War

Matt Carr discusses Sherman's March to the Sea, a key turning point in the American Civil War.

Podcast: The Turin Shroud

Charles Freeman discusses his research into one of history's greatest mysteries.

A Rare Species: Britain's Non-Royal Dukedoms

Two recent notable deaths are a reminder of an endangered British species: the non-royal duke and duchess.

In the November issue of History Today

The Shroud of Turin, Joan of Arc's 'visions' and the invention of Total War.

In The Magazine

The Struggle for Poland at the Congress of Vienna

Vladimir Putin is by no means the first Russian leader to threaten his neighbours with force and annexations. Two centuries ago European statesmen faced a similar predicament. Only then it was Poland at stake, not Ukraine, as Mark Jarrett explains.

A Monarch and his Mignons: Henry III's Court

The young men who surrounded Henry III of France have been dismissed by some historians as effeminate, inconsequential sycophants. Robert Knecht offers a very different account of their activities and influence.

A Distant Corner of the Eastern Front, 1914

Roger Hudson gives context to a photograph highlighting the plight of Galician Jews after the Russian army's invasion in the Great War.

Gold, Fire and Gallows: Quarantine in History

As the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues its dreadful march, Duncan McLean looks at the 600-year-old practice of isolating individuals and communities in order to bring an end to epidemics and assesses the effectiveness of such measures.

Death at St Paul's Cathedral

Richard Dale investigates the mysterious death of Richard Hunne in Lollards Tower at Old St Paul’s, one of the most notorious episodes of the English Reformation.


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