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Scotland's Referendum: Home Rule All Round?

Before discussing the possibility of Home Rule, Britain needs to get its 'House' in order, argues Naomi Lloyd-Jones.

In Good Company: Re-evaluating the legacy of the East India Company

How one company opened an entire sub-continent to economic and political development, with huge ramifications for India, Britain, and the world.

Johnson and Boswell in Africa

The time travellers explore the African interior with Burton and Speke.

In the October issue of History Today

In the October edition of History Today, Linda Porter looks at the short but distinguished rule of James V of Scotland.

 

Podcast: The Nazi-Soviet Pact

In this episode, Roger Moorhouse joins us to discuss the Nazi-Soviet Pact of 1939-41.

Tattooed Britannia

In embracing tattoos, the people of Britain are returning to their ancient roots, argues Paul Lay.

Exhibition Review: Architecture in Italian Renaissance Painting

Philippa Joseph reviews an exhibition at the National Gallery, London.

Votes for Women: The Fight for Female Suffrage

A map of women's political rights around the world, from 1892 until the present day.

In The Magazine

The Lost King of Scotland

During his brief lifetime, James V was a popular ruler who aimed to maintain Scotland’s independence and safeguard its place on the European stage. Linda Porter describes his reign and the fraught relationship between the young king and his English uncle, Henry VIII.

King Harry in the Round

Stephen Cooper admires an article from 1967 that sought to separate historical fact from fiction in Shakespeare’s portrayal of England’s much mythologised warrior king.

Speaking in Code

Alarm about moral degeneracy and ‘family values’ provoked Hollywood to instigate its own self-censorship codes in the 1920s. But much more than prudery underpinned their lasting impact, says Tim Stanley.

British Law and Order in Cyprus

Alexios Alecou explains how Britain sought to police the strategically important island in the eastern Mediterranean.

Poirot or Scheherazade?

Are historians inevitably faced with a choice between academic analysis or popular narrative, or should they aim to master both skills, asks Suzannah Lipscomb.


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