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In the November issue of History Today

The Shroud of Turin, Joan of Arc's 'visions' and the invention of Total War.

Did Britain Fail Hong Kong?

Could Britain have done more in the years leading up to 1997 to ensure Hong Kong's freedoms?

Mirror Year: How Old Are You Really?

Chris Lowry puts a lifetime into historical perspective.

Our New Office

A few pictures of our suitably historic new abode.

Photography in Museums: The Eyes Have It

Paul Lay reflects on the fashion for taking photographs in museums and galleries.

Scotland's Referendum: Home Rule All Round?

Before discussing the possibility of Home Rule, Britain needs to get its 'House' in order, argues Naomi Lloyd-Jones.

In Good Company: Re-evaluating the legacy of the East India Company

How one company opened an entire sub-continent to economic and political development, with huge ramifications for India, Britain, and the world.

Johnson and Boswell in Africa

The time travellers explore the African interior with Burton and Speke.

In The Magazine

The Regicides in America

On the Restoration, Charles II pardoned the many supporters of Cromwell’s Protectorate, with the exception of those directly involved in the execution of his father. These men now found their lives to be at great risk and several fled the country, as Charles Spencer explains.

In Focus: Titanic's Sisters

Roger Hudson visits the Belfast shipyard in 1911, where the Titanic and her sister ships, Britannic and Olympic were constructed.

Banks to the Rescue

The opening battle of the First World War was won by the Bank of England before the British had so much as fired a shot.

The Lost King of Scotland

During his brief lifetime, James V was a popular ruler who aimed to maintain Scotland’s independence and safeguard its place on the European stage. Linda Porter describes his reign and the fraught relationship between the young king and his English uncle, Henry VIII.

For England’s Sake: Women Engineers in the First World War

Describing the First World War as ‘an engineers’ war’, which required ‘arms more than men’, Lloyd George acted on the urgent need to employ women in the armaments industries. Henrietta Heald explains how they in turn responded to the challenges.


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