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On The Blog

Alternative Histories: Robert the Bruce on Rathlin Island

The Scottish patriot makes a surprising confession.

In the August issue of History Today

The outbreak of the First World War, the day Washington burned and the secret history of the Panama Canal.

The Black Prince and the Tour de France

The visitor to Leeds this summer may be surprised to see the Black Prince sporting the Maillot Jaune, usually worn by the leader of the Tour de France. Fortunately, there is a simple explanation.

Gallery: London's Bridges

Pictures of London's bridges, old and new.

The History Today Quiz: July 2014

This month's quiz includes questions on the Ottoman Empire, the Klondike Gold Rush and the Seven Years' War.

Reconstructing Baroque Opera

The recently opened Sam Wanamaker Theatre marks an intriguing step forward in the revival of baroque opera, says Mark Ronan. 

Alternative Designs for Tower Bridge

One of the world's most famous bridges turns 120 years old this week. But its distinctive design almost didn't come to pass.

Podcast: Africans in Georgian England

Onyeka joins us to introduce a number of aspiring Africans who made an impact on Georgian society during the 18th century.

In The Magazine

The Military Covenant: Rhetoric and Reality

The compact between the British state and those prepared to die for it is a dubious one, argues Sarah Ingham.

Stranger than the Nights

Justin Marozzi admires Hugh Kennedy’s article from 2004, which offers a nuanced portrait of the great Abbasid caliph, Harun al Rashid, much-mythologised hero of The Arabian Nights

Black Equestrians

Africans in Georgian Britain have often been portrayed as victims of slavery, unfortunates at the bottom of the social heap. The reality was far more fluid and varied, as Onyeka shows, with many African gentlemen sharing the same cultural and social aspirations as their fellow Englishmen.

Secrets of Scriptoria

The medieval scriptorium was not necessarily the ordered hive of activity we have come to imagine

The 1954 World Cup: Triumph of a New Germany

Germany will be among the favourites to lift the World Cup this summer. But when West Germany won the competition for the first time in 1954 they were the unfancied representatives of a divided nation emerging from defeat and humiliation, says Paul Legg.


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