Tudor

During the Reformation, writes Christine King, Tudor agents demolished many venerated shrines, and made great use of the frauds and trickeries that they claimed to have detected.

James Marshall-Cornwall describes a Tudor adventure, ultimately unsuccessful: Willoughby perished on the Kola peninsula; Chancellor reached Moscow and was received by Ivan the Terrible.

David Starkey describes a small-scale, regional, sixteenth century event that, nonetheless, illuminates the age.

After the excommunication of Queen Elizabeth, writes M.L. Clarke, Rome became a centre of her enemies, and every English traveller was apt to be regarded with suspicion.

Minna F. Weinstein profiles the last Queen of Henry VIII; a Protestant of learning who helped to determine the religious future of England.

William Seymour describes how there was royal displeasure when a near cousin of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs married in secret.

Norman Lloyd Williams analyses the observations of Etienne Perlin during his visit in 1553.

C.G. Cruickshank describes how, having captured Tournai, the twenty-two-year-old king indulged his taste for sport and pageantry.

William Seymour introduces Sir John Seymour; an uncle of the King, and a favourite of the late Henry VIII, Somerset had an amiable character not strong enough for perilous mid-Tudor times.

Joseph M. Levine introduces the modern historians' forerunners; the men who invented the techniques and defined the problems of studying the past.