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Alexander Lee

St Francis of Assisi Speaking with the Wolf of Gubbio, by Stefano di Giovanni di Consolo, ‘Il Sassetta’, 1437-44. Photo © Luisa Ricciarini/Bridgeman Images

The most maligned of creatures, since ancient times, wolves have played a central role in mythology.

Haggis-maker Andrew Majnik with a haggis, David Jones food store, 29 December 1961 © Alan E Funnell/Fairfax Media/Getty Images.

The origins of haggis are as mysterious as the Loch Ness Monster.

On board a factory ship: gutting, cleaning and storing cod in the hold. Engraving from Encyclopedia of Natural History, Augsburg, 1804 © Bridgeman Images.

The Portuguese national dish with a global past of ingenuity and exploitation.

Jackson Street, San Francisco’s Chinatown, 1962 © Bridgeman Images

A dish which arrived with the Gold Rush, spread with the railway and endured prohibition was Chinese by origin, but claimed by America.

A scene of feasting, c.1594, Ottoman Empire © Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas/Bridgeman Images

A celebrated dish of the Ottoman Empire that spread far and wide.

Native Americans cook fish in an engraving from A brief and true Report of the New Found Land of Virginia by Thomas Harriot, 1590 © Bridgeman Images

A Native American method of tenderising meat goes global.

Cold meats: Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe, by Édouard Manet, 1863 © Bridgeman Images

From high life to country living.

Enchiladas.

While finding its origins in royal Aztec feasts, the everyday Tex-Mex enchilada is more a product of colonialism and prejudice than authentic heritage.

Roadside stand at Boston Beach on Jamaica’s north-east coast.

Travelling the world with the diaspora, jerk is an artefact of Jamaica’s troubled colonial history and a powerful testament to the island’s centuries-long quest for freedom.

Victorian Easter simnel cake, 1893.

The evolution of an English Easter delicacy associated with mothers and Tudor pretenders.