Volume 68 Issue 12 December 2018

Rich enough to appeal to lords and dukes, the success of panettone is down to its festive, egalitarian simplicity.

The fall of man and the concept of Original Sin.

The voice of the British monarch carried considerable weight in imperial India. Its slow silencing mirrored the retreat of Britain from the subcontinent. 

‘The greatest good for the greatest number’ flounders when society cannot agree on what is ‘good’ – or ‘bad’. 

Charles Dickens’ name conjures up the quintessential English Christmas, but it is to another Charles D that we must look if we want to know what festivities were like before the Victorian makeover. 

Mikhail Gorbachev’s Perestroika triggered an outpouring of resentment across the USSR. In 1986, young Kazakhs made their voices heard, but the Soviet regime was not ready to listen.

Britain was neither the first country, nor the last, to give women the vote. It was one part of a global movement.

Female volunteers such as Marie Schmolka played a decisive role in the collaborative project to rescue beleaguered Jewish children.

Changing views of illegitimate children raise both moral and economic issues.

Norwich prospered in the 16th century, thanks to an influx of immigrants, who arrived fleeing persecution.

Folklore, fairies and demonic spirits in the sceptical 17th century.

As today, accusations of rape in 19th-century America inevitably, and repeatedly, met with harsh backlashes against the victims.

From the Thirty Years War to the ancient civilisation of Iran, from Anglo-American rivalries in the desert to the persecution of indigenous peoples, historians select their favourite books of the past year.

In Robert Darnton’s hands the accounts and letters of the Société typographique de Neuchâtel (STN) become an eye-opening story of how foreign...
Diarmaid MacCulloch is one of our greatest living historians and this is one of his finest books. One might have thought that, after A History of...
There are several ways of writing the history of a place. There is the personal approach, in which history is interspersed with experiences and...

When it comes to rapid world-changing events, the Meiji Restoration has few equals.

How does the reader decide if a history book is worth their time?