Volume 63 Issue 10 October 2013

The Parisian idol died on 11 October 1963.

The last Vietnamese emperor was born on October 22nd, 1913.

The great humanitarian organisation was founded on October 29th, 1863.

The last Vietnamese emperor was born on October 22nd, 1913.

The great humanitarian organisation was founded on October 29th, 1863.

Richard Barber examines recently unearthed sources to construct a convincing scenario of Edward III’s inspired victory over the French in 1346.

Medicine in early modern Britain is commonly perceived as crude and ineffective. But for all its shortcomings, says Alun Withey, there was no shortage of medical practitioners.

This month marks the 40th anniversary of one of television’s greatest history documentary series. Taylor Downing celebrates The World at War.

Imperial Britain appealed to the men of its colonies to come to the aid of the Mother Country during the First World War. Many did so but their contribution has not always been honoured, says Stephen Bourne.

Jonathan Conlin finds a surprising story of Anglo-French exchange behind the frothing petticoats and high kicks of this most Parisian of dances.

Roger Hudson examines a photograph of July 1909, which captures the early 20th-century vogue for balloon racing.

Martin Evans explains the aims and origins of France’s national museum of immigration.

The army has been a player in the affairs of Egypt for at least 5,000 years, says Tom Holland.

October 2013 marks the 70th anniversary of the mass breakout from Sobibór death camp. Althea Williams recalls an extraordinary event that is today largely forgotten.

Hannah Greig reassesses a ground-breaking article, which proposed new ways of understanding Georgian radicalism.

Martin Evans explains the aims and origins of France’s national museum of immigration.

The army has been a player in the affairs of Egypt for at least 5,000 years, says Tom Holland.

October 2013 marks the 70th anniversary of the mass breakout from Sobibór death camp. Althea Williams recalls an extraordinary event that is today largely forgotten.

Stephen Usherwood recounts the lively reports sent from the goldfields of Yukon by Flora Shaw, the British journalist and writer, which began to appear in English newspapers in August 1898.

As a new translation of the writings of the ‘father of history’ is published, Paul Cartledge looks at the methods of enquiry that make the Greek master such a crucial influence on historians today.

As the dispute continues between Spain and Britain over the jurisdiction of the waters around Gibraltar, Ben Wilson explains the Rock’s role in British history since its acquisition in 1713.

The year 1913 marked a resurgence for the Russian empire as the Romanov dynasty celebrated its 300th anniversary and the economy boomed. Had it not been for the First World War the country’s fortunes might have taken a very different turn, says Charles Emmerson.