Volume 62 Issue 11 November 2012

The first commercially successful machine gun emerged on November 4th, 1862.

Hanoverian precedents for the wayward behaviour of royal younger brothers.

The great English king was born on November 13th, 1312.

The erudite courtier, and inventor of the flush water closet, died on November 20th, 1612.

The great English king was born on November 13th, 1312.

The erudite courtier, and inventor of the flush water closet, died on November 20th, 1612.

The battle of the Milvian Bridge in October 312 has attained legendary status as the moment when the Emperor Constantine secured the future of Christianity in Europe. But the real turning point, argues Michael Mulryan, took place a few months earlier.

Humiliating, painful and reminiscent of crucifixion, the British army’s Field Punishment No 1 fuelled public outrage during the First World War, as Clive Emsley explains.

Since the 1980s the American family has evolved towards greater diversity and complexity. Yet, paradoxically, it is the essentially conservative nuclear family forged in the 1950s that continues to hold sway as a touchstone in US politics and culture, says Tim Stanley.

Richard C. Hall looks at the bloody conflicts in south-eastern Europe which became the blueprint for a century of conflict in the region.

James Barker describes the impact of an SOE mission in wartime Greece 70 years ago this month to demolish the Gorgopotamos railway bridge.

Judith Flanders applauds Jerry White’s analysis of poverty in North London, first published in History Today in 1981.

James Barker describes the impact of an SOE mission in wartime Greece 70 years ago this month to demolish the Gorgopotamos railway bridge.

Colin Smith recounts the Allied invasion of French North Africa, which commenced on November 8th, 1942.

Penelope J. Corfield proposes a new and inclusive long-span history course – the Peopling of Britain – to stimulate a renewed interest in the subject among the nation’s secondary school students. 

Gyanesh Kudaisya considers how the Sino-Indian war of 1962 has shaped relations between Asia’s two largest nations.

For three generations one Calcutta family pioneered cultural, political and social advance, making a profound mark on Indian modernity, says Chandak Sengoopta.

Roger Hudson expands on an image of Russian ships destroyed by the Japanese at Port Arthur, 1904.

Jacob Middleton finds that, far from being a relic of a cruel Victorian past, corporal punishment became more frequent and institutionalised in 20th-century England.

Edward III’s 700th anniversary is a suitable moment to celebrate one of England’s greatest monarchs, says Ian Mortimer.

Sarah Mortimer looks at the historiography of what followed the British Civil Wars: the Republic led by Oliver Cromwell.

Panikos Panayi explores attitudes to German prisoners interned during the First World War.