Charles I

The Rehabilitation of Charles I

The myths that surround the ultimately tragic rule of Charles I mask the realities of a courageous and uxorious king who fell foul of a bitter struggle between two sides of English Protestantism.

The Tragedy of Charles I

Nearly 400 years after his execution, Charles I’s actions and legacy continue to divide scholarly opinion.

Reluctant Regicides

Why do modern Britons still find it so hard to acknowledge their revolutionary past?

Clarendon’s History of the Rebellion

Clarendon’s great ‘History’ was composed largely in exile and published after his death. Hugh Trevor-Roper discusses how the historian had originally intended this great work to be private political advice to the King.

Great Strafford?

C.V. Wedgwood analyses the life, death, and influence of Thomas Wentworth, first earl of Strafford.

Charles I’s Dwarf

C. Northcote Parkinson describes the life and times of Jeffery Hudson of Oakham, Rutlandshire, a remarkable member of Charles I's court who nonetheless measured under three feet tall.

Connoisseur and Diplomat

C.V. Wedgwood recounts the circumstances the Earl of Arundel’s Embassy to Germany in 1636 as recounted in William Crowne’s Diary, the Earl’s letters and other contemporary sources.

Cromwell and the Execution of Charles I

Oliver Cromwell was at heart no republican; but he believed that God manifested His will through the triumphs or misfortunes that He awarded to those engaged in “great businesses”. Charles Ogilvie writes how Charles's continued misjudgments revealed that, if the world were to be made safe for the “Godly,” the King must be executed.