War in the West

Reviews

Ukraine stood at the very heart of Hitler's perverted vision for Eastern Europe; the centrepiece of the Nazi Lebensraum project and an economic powerhouse, it was also home to nearly three million Jews.

Such a subject would be difficult to...

This accessible and well-written synthesis offers grim details of punishments prescribed for various 'crimes' across the globe over more than 2,000 years. What did the laws of the ancient world have in common with those of today? Rather a lot, it...

Flattened out, Bhutan's landmass might stretch across as much as half of her southern neighbour, India. But Bhutan is a small, remote and mountainous state nestled in the Himalayas. Unsurprisingly, much of Bhutan's history remains shrouded in...

This tour de force stunningly reconceives the American Civil War. It shows how European public opinion impelled the North to free slaves; how transatlantic responses to the conflict clinched Union victory; and how both outcomes quashed French and...

'It is up to you to save the world', said Tsar Alexander to the Duke of Wellington as he left the Congress of Vienna to take charge of the allied army hastily reassembled to confront Napoleon in the summer of 1815. Britain's allies comprised...

Head Hunters begins with a journey. A group of young Cambridge scientists embarks on an expedition to the Australasian islands of the Torres Strait in 1898. They set out to study the anthropology and psychology of the locals to...

'The peoples of England and France and the countries in which they lived were … changed in deeply significant ways by the experience of the Hundred Years War.' So concludes David Green's book, which explores a...

Taylor Downing is keen to dispel two misconceptions about the First World War. The first is that it was about ragged troops locked in a muddy stalemate on the Western Front. The second is that science contributed little more to the conflict than...

The author's initial impetus for this book was to understand the role George W. Bush's religious beliefs played in his foreign policy decisions. However, soon realising that too many documents relevant to that exploration were still classified, ...

Around 1300 a Northamptonshire man called Richard Mandeville killed his brother in the course of a stone-throwing competition. Whether this was accidental or premeditated we shall never know, for Richard claimed immunity from prosecution by...

Babylon lies approximately 85 kilometres south of Baghdad, on the fertile soils of the Euphrates. Throughout history its physical location, though important, has mattered less than its symbolism. Artists, writers and politicians have nurtured...

To present the whole thousand years of medieval European history in a single offering needs an exceptionally large-minded historian, with a strong take. In the German original of Das Mittelalter in 2008, Johannes Fried gave German-...

The French are visible all over London and not just in the South Kensington area, or ‘Frog Valley’ as it is affectionately known. One can buy French books in French bookshops, catch a whiff of freshly-baked baguettes drifting from French...

A good, accessible biographic contextualisation of Clausewitz’s writings has been long overdue. Peter Paret’s Clausewitz and the State (2007) remains brilliant, but is mainly for a scholarly audience. Donald Stoker’s book will please...

In the 1967 Six Day War Israel occupied the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, the two districts so often mentioned in one breath as the ‘Palestinian occupied territories’. However, the differences between the two districts are striking. While the...

To the modern imagination, French Jewish life under the Vichy Regime (1940-44) has long been associated with antisemitism, persecution, betrayal and the notorious Vel d’Hiv round-up of July 1942...

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