Marlborough College Summer School

Reviews

Ralph Waldo Emerson once said that ‘money often costs too much’, a sentiment that would have rung true to governing politicians in the early years of Germany’s Weimar Republic. They faced the choice of deflationary policies, which would stabilise...

This is the best history yet written of a British institution. Like Panayi’s earlier work, Spicing Up Britain: The Multicultural History of British Food (2008), this one is alive to the cosmopolitan origins of food through global...

Anna Whitelock’s lively and engaging history begins when Elizabeth is a 13-year-old princess and ends with a brief survey of films and books that indicate our perennial fascination with the...

Among the many ways in which the First World War influenced the Second, genocide has received comparatively little mention. This vast, comprehensive two-volume work more than makes up for any...

Good Germans should like Churchill, because the British prime minister was the most dogged opponent of Hitler and only a few, very bad, Germans like Hitler these days. However, there are one or...

The most striking thing about Hasia Diner’s most recent book is that it is uplifting and upbeat, a rare thing in accounts of European Jewish...

Like sport, politics is a form of theatre. It has elements of soap opera, melodrama, comedy and tragedy. It encompasses the interplay of ideas and personalities. It foregrounds clashes between...

This highly entertaining and often surprising volume recasts our understanding of the contexts of Jewish life in Eastern Europe. The author looks at three Russian provinces created in territories annexed from Poland-Lithuania in the first...

Another year, another biography of Elizabeth I. Even the most ardent admirer of Gloriana might be forgiven for thinking that just a little breathing space is required.  One wonders what more there is to be said. Enter Lisa Hilton with what she...

Boris Johnson states that his intention in writing this book was two-fold: to bring knowledge of Churchill to a younger generation that knows little about him and to show that one person can change the course of history. Cynics may regard the...

The centenary of the outbreak of the First World War has reawakened controversy about its origins. Those of the Second World War are less debatable, but arguments over its legacy continue. Once a paradigm of British triumph, it is an event that,...

India presents its historian with unique challenges. It is a land of great disparity in economic conditions. It is composed of many linguistic groups and diverse cultures. India has had a long history of engagement with the world outside. Yet,...

Western historians have tended to focus on one Arab Revolt in the early 20th century, while ignoring another, which was bigger and, in the opinion of the author of this vivid book, almost as significant.

The revolt which generally grabs...

A quarter of a century ago, when the Berlin Wall fell, there was an expectation that the Evil Empire’s colonies, no longer subjugated by the yoke of statist orthodoxy, would blithely ascend to the Reaganomic utopia they had been presumed to covet...

In this scholarly but immensely readable book Matt Cook explores the domestic interiors of homosexual men at various times from the end of the 19th century to the onset of AIDS and the acceptance of gay parenting. Trawling through diaries,...

A key debate in recent Soviet historiography has concerned the impact of Stalinist propaganda on citizens’ attitudes and identities. It has tended to focus on their resistance to authority at one extreme and an inability to resist Soviet models...