Inchmarlo

Reviews

The Indian army that arrived in Marseilles six weeks after the start of the war was probably the most curious of the First World War. In a battle for freedom the Indian army was from a country that was itself not free and to call it Indian was a...

Baghdad is at once familiar and yet quintessentially unknown. Regularly and for so long has it made the news that we are inured to the apparently unchanging narrative of random violence, political corruption and human tragedy in the city.

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For students of Russian history and observers of Putin’s Russia, the rehabilitation of the Stalinist past and Josef Stalin’s resurgent personal popularity is a disturbing development. Ever since Stalin’s death in March 1953, his ghost has...

The enticing title of this book unfortunately turns out to be something of a misnomer. Instead of hearing how key urban centres shaped the British Empire, we get the historical equivalent of Around The World in 80 Days: a whirlwind tour...

For most people the Byzantine Empire is probably an unfamiliar entity, despite its historical importance. The empire (in reality the Roman Empire that survived throughout the medieval period centred on the ancient Greek city of Byzantium; the...

Ask a Londoner today which beasts they are nearest to and they may well reply that you are never more than six feet away from a rat. Similarly, the city has no shortage of starlings, pigeons and foxes, the animals with which Londoners are most...

This wide-ranging book has been designed for undergraduate courses on the Holocaust. It covers many of the topics that students will touch on in their courses, doing so in a concise, readable fashion.

Implicitly, by starting with three...

When Irvin Ehrenpreis put the final full stop to his triple-decker biography of Jonathan Swift published between 1962 and 1983, one thing at least was certain: the job would have to be done all over again. 

Ehrenpreis had produced a...

Life, the philosopher Kierkegaard believed, is lived forward but can only be understood backwards. Our understanding of history is also refracted through the prism of the present. ‘Even if’, David Reynolds argues, ‘historians write forwards,...

Clement Attlee, Labour prime minister between 1945 and 1951 in the pioneering years that saw the emergence of the modern welfare state and the National Health Service, has always been something of an enigma and the butt of jokes, including...

Arguably, most officers in the British army would agree that Field Marshal the Viscount Slim – ‘Uncle Bill’ – was the Second World War general whom they most admired. Unrestricted by epoch, many would still bring a large vote for Slim’s humanity...

By any standards the 15-year reign of the French king Henry III (1574-89) was troubled and inauspicious. 

Plagued by ill-health, the exercise of his authority beset by political rivalries and confessional division and finally assassinated...

Helen McCarthy’s latest book is one of the most important studies on diplomatic practice to have been published in many years. It is the first academically rigorous account of the role that women played in the conduct of British foreign policy...

Target: Italy is the latest book commissioned by the Cabinet Office to tell the story of the Special Operations Executive (SOE) in various sectors of Britain’s Second World War. Covering the time when Italy was actively participating in...

Simon Bolivar

Innumerable biographies of Simón Bolívar crowd the shelves, yet this aristocratic rebel against Spain, who transformed the history of South America at the start of the 19th century, remains a shadowy figure outside his own continent. Many will...

The Italian soldier, Giulio Douhet, is one of the few well-known names in the history of air power strategy, along with Hugh Trenchard, father of the RAF, and Billy Mitchell, the American air power pioneer. Command of the Air, originally...

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