East India Company

Reviews

The feeling of awe and excitement, akin to meeting one’s idol, will be familiar to anyone lucky enough to make medieval manuscripts their life’s work. It is Christopher de Hamel’s goal with this book to share that feeling: to take manuscripts and...

Upon the death in 1865 of Dr James Barry, the irascible Inspector General of Hospitals, army surgeon and medical reformer, an old friend opened his battered travelling trunk to discover a collage of ‘fashion plates clipped from ladies’ magazines...

Seeing the Virgin Mary is the dream of dreams for many Catholics. Although generally ambivalent about such visions, the Vatican has investigated and pronounced some of them as true apparitions of the Virgin. At other times the papal authorities...

Clement Attlee, the postwar Labour prime minister who often tops the lists of best British prime ministers of the 20th century, is attracting increasing attention at a time when the Labour Party continues its internal battles over its quality and...

Adrien Lejeune, grocer and apothecary, was born in 1847 in Bagnolet, then just beyond the walls of Paris; he died in 1942 in Novosibirsk, Siberia, but is now buried at the Mur des Fédérés in the Père Lachaise cemetery, which marks the...

In January 1898, Winston Churchill returned to Bangalore to troubling news. His mother, Lady Randolph Churchill, had to restructure her finances owing to major debts and needed to take out a £17,000 loan (about £1,700,000 in today’s money). This...

Jan Plamper opens The History of Emotions with a visit to an anatomy room. His research on the history of fear among soldiers had led him to examine the human amygdala, the almond-shaped mass of nerve cells beneath the cerebral cortex,...

Richard W. Bulliet brings a fresh view to a story that interests many: the invention of the wheel, providing new and interesting details about when and why the wheel was first adopted. Unlike existing accounts, Bulliet makes strong and refreshing...

Aleppo, Syria’s second city after Damascus, is one of the oldest settlements on earth, where Abraham is supposed to have milked his flocks in the fortified citadel. Today much of the city is in ruins, fought over by Sunni, Shia, Alawi, Kurd and...

Frank Holt has form in the crowded field of Alexander studies. Good form, too: among the many virtues of his Into the Land of Bones (2005), an account of Alexander’s impressive campaigns in what is today Afghanistan, was its even-...

Mount Sinai holds a special place in the imagination as the place where Moses saw God and received the Tablets of the Law. Few who have visited it will forget its grandeur; its vulnerable situation today in a highly sensitive part of Egypt brings...

This pacy book is a whistle-stop tour of what the dust jacket calls our ‘dark history’, namely the ruthless pursuit of profit at the expense of the law through the traffic of people, goods and ideas. It is a story that stretches across time and...

Those familiar with the obsessive delights of genealogy will have realised that if you can trace your family in Britain back to 1400 you are distantly related to everyone else who can do this and hence to kings, queens and, eventually, to...

Here is is a many-sided tale of Alexander the Great and of arsenic sulphide, of Bavarian limestone and of metaphorical black tigers, of Charlemagne and of the mythical city of Crocodilopolis, not to mention of zhu bo (bamboo and silk)...

Winston Churchill had a long association with Ireland, from his infancy in Dublin in the 1870s to his second premiership in the 1950s. During his life he adopted various stances on Ireland’s political relationship with Britain. As a young...

Oxford is full of history, dating back to its settlement in Saxon times. Yet it is rarely associated with prehistory, especially the Neolithic period beginning just before 4000 BC. In the long hot summer of 1976, that picture changed, at least...