Reviews

The obelisk is that which now graces the south lawn of Kingston Lacy, a magnificent National Trust property in Dorset. The Englishman is the Nubian explorer William John Bankes (1786-1855) who, having admired the obelisk on the island of Philae...

Saladin – victor over the Shi‘i Fatimid caliphate of Cairo, founder of the Ayyubid dynasty, conqueror of Jerusalem – looms large in the history of the Crusades. Praised for his victories, leadership skills and chivalric qualities by supporters...

In what sense is the world of Byzantium lost? Jonathan Harris initially answers that important question by reference to the 16th-century French ambassador, Pierre Gilles, who visited Constantinople a century after its capture by the Turks to find...

On May 7th, 2015, as the polls closed, it seemed certain that the Tories or, more likely, Labour, would have to form a coalition or govern Britain without an overall majority. Moments later the exit poll was broadcast and all was consternation,...

The purpose of this book, whose articles are drawn (updated, though not always the ‘further reading’) from Blackwell’s five-volume Encyclopedia of War (2012), is to provide ‘the essential information on the conflicts and concepts that...

Although Peter Frankopan’s latest book is written as popular history, such was its scope that I approached the preface expecting an academic explanation of methodology, intention, and, very likely, an assertion of authority over the subject....

It is not easy to capture the wonder of the first controlled heavier-than-air flight, the stunned amazement of the onlookers, but David McCullough’s recent book gets close. His The Wright Brothers is a very readable study that gives an...

These essays by the pre-eminent interpreter of the American Revolution deal in equal measure with the impassioned perspectives that animate the creative enterprise of historians; and with the nature and consequences of the peopling of America and...

A generation before Cortés landed on the coast of Mexico, the Portuguese had set out to find the sea route to India and establish control over the trade routes of the western Indian Ocean. These exploits were every bit as daring and, in the long...

The Origin of Museums was wittily named after Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species. Albeit in a...

All too much of the recent literature on the background to the Great War has focused on the diplomacy and has seriously underplayed the roles of military decision-makers, plans and exigencies. This has led to an underrating of the nature and...

Janam Mukherjee has written an engrossing account of the most tragic event in the history of Bengal, the Great Famine of 1943, in which an estimated three million people died. The book is also a rediscovery of Mukherjee’s family roots in pre-...

Michael Jacobs is widely considered one of the most distinguished travel writers of his generation. In particular he wrote perceptively and critically about Spain, an enthusiasm that dated back to his schooldays. When he died, in January 2014, he...

‘Historians and readers’, says the French scholar Pierre Briant at the start of his book, ‘have always been fascinated by the history of great empires and especially by their emergence and disappearance.’ The problem, of course, is that...

Churchill’s involvement with the British Empire has received much attention but his attitude to the Islamic world has been largely neglected. Yet, as Churchill pointed out, the Empire, at its peak, included more Muslims than any other state. He...

Few historians could be better qualified to write this book than the author. Born in Berlin, losing his father on the Eastern Front in the Second World War and emigrating across the Atlantic soon afterwards, Jarausch is in an excellent position...

X

3 issues for £5

Subscribe

Subscribe Today