Reviews

Edith Hall has written a flamboyant, readable and different account of the ancient Greeks, well tailored for the modern reader. She tells the old stories, but she presents them innovatively, in a package of ten chronological chapters structured...

Archive fever among scholars is a poetic if dangerous phenomenon: time spent hunched over disintegrating manuscripts breathing in the occasionally toxic 'dust of the dead', Eureka moments of discovery mixed with hours of boredom and the risk of...

The world might be forgiven for rolling its eyes at the prospect of another book on Shakespeare. Does Shakespeare in London, the latest addition to the Bloomsbury Arden list,  have anything new to say? The answer is a confident yes. ...

John Ruskin anathematised the painter J.M.W.Turner as having ‘lived in imagination in ancient Carthage, lived practically in modern Margate … acknowledging it all the while to be ugly and wrong’. A long western tradition of historical and moral...

There was long a complaint among military historians, one best voiced by Brian Bond, that there was a major disjuncture between their work, notably on the learning curve of the British army during the First World War, and the understanding of the...

The Greeks had their gods and the modern world has the Greeks. Something about them ensured that their political, artistic and philosophical ideas would be spoken about down the centuries in a way that other ancient peoples were not.

They...

Harry Truman’s unexpected victory in the presidential election of 1948 was immortalised by the premature headline printed in the Chicago Tribune, ‘Dewey Defeats Truman,’ which allowed the triumphant, beaming president to gleefully pose...

The records of Geoffrey Chaucer's official activities for the court are plentiful but they reveal nothing about his career as a writer. Worse, Chaucer's compositions contain only elliptical references to his life and contemporaneous events. Faced...

In this volume, Rolf-Dieter Müller, former director of research at the German Military History Research Office, sets out to undermine what he regards as a persistent myth in the scholarship on the German Barbarossa campaign against the Soviet...

Ukraine stood at the very heart of Hitler's perverted vision for Eastern Europe; the centrepiece of the Nazi Lebensraum project and an economic powerhouse, it was also home to nearly three million Jews.

Such a subject would be difficult to...

This accessible and well-written synthesis offers grim details of punishments prescribed for various 'crimes' across the globe over more than 2,000 years. What did the laws of the ancient world have in common with those of today? Rather a lot, it...

Flattened out, Bhutan's landmass might stretch across as much as half of her southern neighbour, India. But Bhutan is a small, remote and mountainous state nestled in the Himalayas. Unsurprisingly, much of Bhutan's history remains shrouded in...

This tour de force stunningly reconceives the American Civil War. It shows how European public opinion impelled the North to free slaves; how transatlantic responses to the conflict clinched Union victory; and how both outcomes quashed French and...

'It is up to you to save the world', said Tsar Alexander to the Duke of Wellington as he left the Congress of Vienna to take charge of the allied army hastily reassembled to confront Napoleon in the summer of 1815. Britain's allies comprised...

Head Hunters begins with a journey. A group of young Cambridge scientists embarks on an expedition to the Australasian islands of the Torres Strait in 1898. They set out to study the anthropology and psychology of the locals to...

'The peoples of England and France and the countries in which they lived were … changed in deeply significant ways by the experience of the Hundred Years War.' So concludes David Green's book, which explores a...

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