Marlborough College Summer School

Reviews

It is ironic that one consequence of the failed Scottish referendum on independence is that the English, who have dominated the British Isles for centuries, are demanding greater devolution. Building nations and national identities demands...

Mathematics and numbers are not really part of what we think about when we think about the past, by and large. So it is nice to see Amir Alexander’s new book, in which he continues his mission to fill a significant gap by writing the history of...

The stresses and strains of the British home front during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars are the subject of Jenny Uglow’s new book. Fascination with the French Revolution and Napoleon remains to this day, but the enormous pressures upon,...

In 1871 Paris revolted against the French state. Many Parisians did not accept France’s defeat in the Franco-Prussian War. Nor did they trust the head of the recently proclaimed Republic, Adolphe Thiers, to defend democracy. When Thiers tried to...

We think we know all about pirates. As a group their ambiguous status is perfectly encapsulated by the phrase ‘one person’s terrorist is another’s freedom fighter’ and pirates wear ridiculous clothes, sport a swearing parrot on the shoulder and...

Malcolm Gaskill offers us hints about what compelled him to write this book. He mentions the ‘astonishing intensity of faith, forbearance and courage’ of colonists, declaring it was the quality of that courage above all which inspired him. At the...

The past is another country because we do things differently here. Even before the witnesses die out, the historians, novelists and filmmakers take over. A past as exceptional and traumatic as...

‘A palatable taster of what ancient literature and culture can do for us in the present day’; so the editors describe this short book. In their engagingly personal essays, Pelling and Wyke reveal a Welsh grammar school boy reading Homer in a...

Emilio Lussu led an extraordinary life. Born into a wealthy family in Sardinia, he was studying law when Italy entered the First World War in 1915. As a convinced Italian nationalist, he volunteered for the army and was sent to the front. His...

In this bravura novel of the Spanish Civil War 1936-39, Catalan author Joan Sales (1912-83) evokes its messy, devastating lived reality, but even more memorably the intense feeling of being alive which war paradoxically produces. Set in the...

Much has been written about the increase in consumption and the growing richness of material life and culture that accompanied the process of industrialisation. Middle- and upper-class incomes were buoyant and, further down the social scale, a...

Travelling across America in the 1970s, Jad Adams chanced upon a statue of the suffrage campaigner Esther Hobart Morris, credited with promoting legislation that made Wyoming the first state to...

The stately, rhythmic elegance of Greek temple architecture has inspired generations of architects (and tourists) from the Romans to the Renaissance to modern times. Wilson Jones’ handsome book...

England, arise is an accessible book, but not one that simplifies the issues or patronises the reader in an attempt to reach a mass market. Instead, Barker provides an exhaustive survey of the evidence available...

Years ago I read, in Margaret Llewellyn Davies’ collection of letters by Women’s Co-operative Guild members, Life as We Have Known It, an account of an eight-year-old agricultural...

The latest book from Judith Flanders explores the intriguing phenomenon of what makes a ‘home’ in the countries of North-Western Europe and...