War in the West

Reviews

Running from the 16th century right up to the postwar period, The Gardens of the British Working Class traces the diverse ways in which...

After appearing at the Stratford Royal in the hit 1960 musical Fings Ain’t Wot They Used T’Be, the press asked Barbara Windsor if she would be returning to the East End. ‘Are you kidding...

Exactly who were the ‘perfect wives’ of the 1950s? Were they the drably dressed women still queuing for food up to a decade after the Second World War had ended? Or were they sprightly looking females in frilly pinnies, manically waving a feather...

Faced with a man in overalls flecked with white, saying 'I am a painter', we know we are talking to a painter and decorator. Faced with a book entitled Victorian Painting, we expect it to be about the pre-Raphaelites, not about how...

This volume is a sumptuous art history performance, with as many images as there are pages of text. This shows Caroline, the wife of George II, in regal splendour, on the back, a remarkable cut-away drawing of Caroline’s creation, the Merlin’s...

One of the few occasions on which an early modern ruler interacted with his subjects was during a ceremonial entry into one of the cities in his realm. In a ceremony that goes back to the Roman adventus ritual, in which an emperor...

Edith Hall has written a flamboyant, readable and different account of the ancient Greeks, well tailored for the modern reader. She tells the old stories, but she presents them innovatively, in a package of ten chronological chapters structured...

Archive fever among scholars is a poetic if dangerous phenomenon: time spent hunched over disintegrating manuscripts breathing in the occasionally toxic 'dust of the dead', Eureka moments of discovery mixed with hours of boredom and the risk of...

The world might be forgiven for rolling its eyes at the prospect of another book on Shakespeare. Does Shakespeare in London, the latest addition to the Bloomsbury Arden list,  have anything new to say? The answer is a confident yes. ...

John Ruskin anathematised the painter J.M.W.Turner as having ‘lived in imagination in ancient Carthage, lived practically in modern Margate … acknowledging it all the while to be ugly and wrong’. A long western tradition of historical and moral...

There was long a complaint among military historians, one best voiced by Brian Bond, that there was a major disjuncture between their work, notably on the learning curve of the British army during the First World War, and the understanding of the...

The Greeks had their gods and the modern world has the Greeks. Something about them ensured that their political, artistic and philosophical ideas would be spoken about down the centuries in a way that other ancient peoples were not.

They...

Harry Truman’s unexpected victory in the presidential election of 1948 was immortalised by the premature headline printed in the Chicago Tribune, ‘Dewey Defeats Truman,’ which allowed the triumphant, beaming president to gleefully pose...

The records of Geoffrey Chaucer's official activities for the court are plentiful but they reveal nothing about his career as a writer. Worse, Chaucer's compositions contain only elliptical references to his life and contemporaneous events. Faced...

In this volume, Rolf-Dieter Müller, former director of research at the German Military History Research Office, sets out to undermine what he regards as a persistent myth in the scholarship on the German Barbarossa campaign against the Soviet...

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