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EDITOR'S CHOICE

Patricia Fara explores the scientific education of Mary Shelley and how a work of early science fiction inspired her best-known novel Frankenstein.

With the independence referendum just around the corner, Naomi Lloyd-Jones asks why the Scottish Home Rule Association, an important precursor of the SNP, has been largely forgotten.

Volume: 64 Issue: 8 2014

It was Scots who were the most vocal advocates of a vibrant, imperial, Protestant Great Britain,

Volume: 64 Issue: 5 2014

Britain and Russia came close to blows over Crimea in the 18th century.

Volume: 64 Issue: 8 2014

Roger Hudson pictures British gunboat diplomacy in Egypt in 1882.

Volume: 63 Issue: 2 2013

Though they are often seen as polar opposites,the architect of modern Germany and the great British Liberal statesman shared more in common than one might think. Roland Quinault draws comparisons.

Volume: 63 Issue: 11 2013

Mihir Bose recalls a classic case highlighting the problems with Britain’s antiquated libel laws.

Volume: 63 Issue: 5 2013

The term ‘Cobbett and Hunt’ was shorthand for radical politics in the early 19th century, but the petty hatred that developed between the two men had a devastating effect on the outcome of the 1832 Reform Act, says Penny Young.

Volume: 63 Issue: 3 2013

Michelle Liebst looks at how the career of the great explorer of Africa reflects the wider failings of Victorian imperialism.

Volume: 63 Issue: 4 2013

Sally White recalls the efforts of the British League of Help, launched in the wake of the First World War by Lilias, Countess Bathurst, to raise funds to support devastated areas of France.

Volume: 63 Issue: 7 2013

Large numbers of West Africans came to Britain to study in the postwar years. Many placed their children in the care of white, working-class families. Jordanna Bailkin describes how it was not just Britain’s diplomatic relationships that were transformed at the end of empire but also social and personal ones.

Volume: 63 Issue: 8 2013

As the dispute continues between Spain and Britain over the jurisdiction of the waters around Gibraltar, Ben Wilson explains the Rock’s role in British history since its acquisition in 1713.

Volume: 63 Issue: 10 2013

Syrie Maugham was a businesswoman and beauty whose interior designs became a sensation on both sides of the Atlantic. However her relationships with a series of prominent men left her personal life in tatters. Frances Larson tells her story.

Volume: 63 Issue: 1 2013

Tim Pat Coogan points the finger of blame for the Great Famine at ministers in Lord Russell’s government, which came to power in 1846, and sees echoes of the disaster in the Republic’s current economic plight.

Volume: 63 Issue: 2 2013

Victoria Gardner looks back at earlier attitudes to Britain’s press freedom and how the withdrawal of the Licensing Act of 1662 spawned a nation of news addicts.

Volume: 63 Issue: 2 2013

The recent introduction of police commissioners to England and Wales is supposed to bring the force closer to the people. But, asks Clive Emsley, where is the evidence for that?

Volume: 63 Issue: 1 2013

Postwar Britain’s relationship with its past was laid bare in a long-running television show, argues Tim Stanley.

Volume: 63 Issue: 3 2013

Nigel Watson celebrates 80 years of the British Interplanetary Society.

Volume: 63 Issue: 1 2013

The Whig interpretation of the past is a moral fable more akin to theology than history, argues Tim Stanley.

Volume: 63 Issue: 5 2013

Exhuming historical characters makes for dramatic headlines and can seem a great way to get easy answers, but we should think twice before disturbing the remains of dead monarchs, says Justin Pollard.

Volume: 63 Issue: 4 2013

Established partly in response to the long-feared French invasion and partly to quell unrest at home, the yeomanry were increasingly used by the authorities to intervene on the side of employers in disputes and riots. The ensuing armed clashes present the clearest example of class warfare in early 19th-century Britain, says Nick Mansfield.  

Volume: 63 Issue: 8 2013

Stephen Bates on the divisions that split Peel’s Tory administration in the mid-1840s, resonant of splits in the Conservative Party today.

Volume: 63 Issue: 3 2013

Jeremy Black considers Hanoverian precedents for the wayward behaviour of royal younger brothers.

Volume: 62 Issue: 11 2012

The pioneering female traveller was born on October 13th, 1862.

Volume: 62 Issue: 10 2012

Robert Colls asks what British identity is - and what it is not.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

As the democratic franchise expanded in the 19th century, British historians were eager to offer an informed view of the past to the new electorate. We need similar initiatives today, argues John Tosh.

Volume: 62 Issue: 7 2012

Growing nationalism in the UK’s constituent countries threatens the study of Celtic languages and history, argues Elizabeth Boyle.

Volume: 62 Issue: 8 2012

Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland is one event that the British can never remember and the Irish can never forget. Tom Reilly questions one of the most enduring and troubling topics in Irish history. 

Volume: 62 Issue: 9 2012

Humiliating, painful and reminiscent of crucifixion, the British army’s Field Punishment No 1 fuelled public outrage during the First World War, as Clive Emsley explains.

Volume: 62 Issue: 11 2012

The ‘British Empire’ was the name given by imperialists in the late 19th century to Britain’s territorial possessions. It was meant to create an image of unity and strength. But such a view is illusory, argues Bernard Porter.

Volume: 62 Issue: 10 2012

As the debate continues on the causes of last summer’s English Riots, Michael Roberts examines previous attempts by reformers to address moral malaise and social breakdown.

Volume: 62 Issue: 2 2012

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