Between 1798 and 1800, writes Geoffrey Bennett, a Russian fleet co-operated with the British in the Mediterranean.

Vladimir Putin is by no means the first Russian leader to threaten his neighbours with force and annexations. Two centuries ago European statesmen faced a similar predicament. Only then it was Poland at stake, not Ukraine, as Mark Jarrett explains.

During the fierce struggle that followed the Russian Revolution, writes David Footman, an intrepid Ukrainian guerilla leader waged war against Whites and Reds alike.

General Sir Robert Wilson’s impressions in 1807 and 1812; a paper delivered by D.G. Chandler at the Congress of Historical Sciences, Moscow, 1970.

On the Neva in 1740, writes Mina Curtiss, Peter the Great’s niece constructed a winter palace.

Roger Moorhouse tells the story of the Lützow, a partly built German cruiser delivered to the Soviet Union in 1940 and renamed the Petropavlovsk, following the Nazi-Soviet Pact of 1939.

Britain and Russia came close to blows over Crimea in the 18th century.

Henry Kamen describes the apotheosis of emancipated Russian womanhood.

T.J. Brady introduces Roger Fenton, an early photographer at a Victorian front.

Sydney D. Bailey offers up a study in Soviet diplomacy.