Harold Nicolson assesses the impact of the German minister in the post Bismarck era.

Hitler had taken enthusiastically to his years in the army during the first World War. D.C. Watt describes how, afterwards, the future führer worked with equal zeal — and served his political apprenticeship — as a propagandist for a Bavarian counter-revolutionary army group.

The conflagration of the Reichstag provided Hitler with a heaven-sent opportunity. But, writes A.J.P. Taylor, the theory that the Nazis had planned it themselves now appears to be entirely baseless.

Through a succession of crises, writes Philip Windsor, including those of the Airlift and the Wall, the West has for seventeen years maintained an apparently untenable position in Berlin.

Michael D. Richards profiles the Marxist Revolutionary whose life was devoted to the Communist and Socialist movements in Poland and Germany.

At the close of the First World War, writes David WoodwardGerman Sailors were the forerunners of general revolt against the imperial system.

For German national identity, winter is a metaphor that keeps on giving.

All the Nazi leaders had a talent for self-dramatisation. None was more enamoured of the role he had chosen than Heinrich Himmler.

After a reign of forty-eight years, Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg, left behind him in 1688 a military and bureaucratic system that endured until 1945. F.L. Carsten describes how it was the army he had founded that accomplished, in 1871, the triumphant unification of the German Empire and fought the battles of the Third Reich.

East Germans recall their experiences 25 years after the DDR’s slow death.



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