England

J.F. Battick and N.C. Klimavicz describe a parliamentary dispute over Cromwell’s statue.

In 1785, writes Mary Beth Norton, a Loyalist physician from Boston made the first aerial flight across the English Channel.

Among the traditional heroes of Trades Unionism, writes Stephen Usherwood, are the six Dorset labourers who were sentenced to transportation for ‘administering illegal oaths’.

For forty years, writes D.M. Hopkinson, the eccentric Vicar of a remote parish in Cornwall led a richly combative life both in High Church politics and in literature.

During the eighteenth century, writes Bill Hooper, ‘barbaric anarchy’ reigned at Eton.

The Italian patriot’s visit to England was extraordinarily successful. But, writes Christopher Hibbert, Queen Victoria deplored the scenes it provoked; and Karl Marx described them as “a miserable spectacle of imbecility”.

By challenging and destroying the system of General Warrants, John Wilkes struck an important blow for civil liberty in England, writes George Rudé.

M.F. Bond recounts the historical and legislative passage of an Act of Parliament.

Cross-Channel relations were cordial during the reign of the Emperor Napoleon III, writes Joanna Richardson.

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