England

Along with Robin Hood, the romantic highwayman is one of the great myths of English outlawry. But the model for this most gallant of rogues was a Frenchman, who carried out audacious robberies with a touch of Parisian flair. John Sugden on Claude Duval’s life and legend.

The small city of Hereford became one of England’s most important pilgrim sites due to the many miracles attributed to a local saint. Ian Bass explains what they reveal about life in the Middle Ages.  

The world does not influence Britain’s native culture, the world is its culture, as anyone with a grasp of the country’s history will understand, argues Suzannah Lipscomb.

A recently discovered 17th-century shipwreck has caused speculation among experts. Richard Blakemore considers the often overlooked importance of maritime affairs on the course of the Civil Wars. 

A look at John Ogilby's Britannia road atlas of 1675.

It was during the Tudor age that the first British antiquarians emerged, detailing the nation’s history and geography – or so the traditional story goes. But, as Nicholas Orme explains, William Worcester had laid the groundwork for their advances and anticipated their interests a century before.

The discovery in Victorian London of the remains of ancient animals – and a fascination with their modern descendants – helped to transform people’s ideas of the deep past, as Chris Manias reveals.

In the 18th century, when women in scholarship were not encouraged and medieval languages were little-studied even by men, Elizabeth Elstob become a pioneer in Anglo-Saxon studies, her work even finding its way into the hands of Thomas Jefferson.

George Molyneaux explores how the realm of the English, conquered in 1066, was formed. 

Around 1300 a Northamptonshire man called Richard Mandeville killed his brother in the course of a stone-throwing competition. Whether this was...