Volume 66 Issue 11 November 2016

The Victorian masterpiece was burned to the ground on November 29th, 1936. 

Kate Wiles explores a unique nautical chart, designed to be understood only by its creator.

Walatta Petros was a woman feared even by kings. Wendy Laura Belcher tells the story of the Ethiopian saint, her relationships with centuries of monarchs and the stories of the miracles she performed.

Witnessing the slow decline of his native Sicily, the last Prince of Lampedusa saw both blame and possible salvation in the island’s unique location and history, writes Alexander Lee.

Since the early 1960s, historians have shone a more positive light on the Battle of the Somme, writes Allan Mallinson. But we must not forget the excesses and failures of that terrible campaign.  

Evidence from Britain’s First World War conscription tribunals reveals a surprisingly efficient and impartial system, as Rebecca Pyne-Edwards Banks asserts in this extract from her 2015 undergraduate dissertation prize-winning essay.   

The contrast between Abraham Lincoln and presidential candidate Donald Trump could hardly be more striking. Yet both men can be placed within the continually evolving politics of the Grand Old Party, argues Tim Stanley.

The castles of Scotland are tangible evidence of the country’s evolution from violent feudalism towards a more settled and centralised nation state. David C. Weinczok explores a land of hill forts, towerhouses and châteaux. 

Since the revolution, French history has been marked by moments that promise progress but end in bitter failure. The election of the Popular Front in 1936 was one such example, says Jonathan Fenby.

One of the grandest, certainly one of the largest, manuscripts produced in the medieval West, the Codex Amiatinus is often overlooked as an Anglo-Saxon treasure. Conor O’Brien shows how its makers used it to assert their identity and to establish their place firmly within the Christian world.

Since it was founded in 1948, the issue of how Britons have laughed with – or at – the NHS reveals much about changes in society, argues Jenny Crane.

The Smithfield Joust of 1467 was a triumph for Edward IV and his dynasty.

State policy, clerical abuse and the intellectually disabled in 1950s Ireland.

Upon the death in 1865 of Dr James Barry, the irascible Inspector General of Hospitals, army surgeon and medical reformer, an old friend opened...

Seeing the Virgin Mary is the dream of dreams for many Catholics. Although generally ambivalent about such visions, the Vatican has investigated...

Clement Attlee, the postwar Labour prime minister who often tops the lists of best British prime ministers of the 20th century, is attracting...

Adrien Lejeune, grocer and apothecary, was born in 1847 in Bagnolet, then just beyond the walls of Paris; he died in 1942 in Novosibirsk, Siberia...

In January 1898, Winston Churchill returned to Bangalore to troubling news. His mother, Lady Randolph Churchill, had to restructure her finances...

Jan Plamper opens The History of Emotions with a visit to an anatomy room. His research on the history of fear among soldiers had led him...