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Volume: 60 Issue: 11

Contents of History Today, November 2010

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Richard Cavendish remembers the attempted coup against the president of South Vietnam, Ngo Dinh Diem, in 1960.

The gulf between the religious ideals of US conservatives and those of the European Enlightenment is as wide as the Atlantic. Tim Stanley looks at the origins and...

Richard Cavendish remembers the birth of the pianist who was also briefly prime minister of Poland.

A century after the execution of Dr Crippen for the murder of his wife, Fraser Joyce argues that, in cases hingeing on identification, histories of forensic...

Amanda Vickery’s new series on the 18th-century home is part of an enlightened new strategy from the BBC, writes Paul Lay.

Frank Dikötter looks at how historians’ understanding of China has changed in recent years with the gradual opening of party archives that reveal the full horror...

To conclude his series on the opportunities offered to historians by new technology, Nick Poyntz looks at how recent developments may help to bridge the gap...

Though they originated in China, it was in the capitals of early modern Europe that fireworks flourished. They united art and science in awesome displays of...

Many reasons have been given for the West’s dominance over the last 500 years. But, Ian Morris argues, its rise to global hegemony was largely due to geographical...

A selection of your correspondence with the editor.

Nothing captures the past like a drop of perfume, says Roja Dove, connoisseur and curator of a recent survey of the history of perfume, as he sniffs out the...

The intriguing death of an Indian holy man in 1985 suggested that he was none other than Subhas Chandra Bose, the revolutionary and nationalist who, it is...

Kevin Sharpe revisits an article by C.V. Wedgwood, first published in History Today in 1960, that looks at the diplomatic mission made by the artist Peter...

Richard Cavendish remembers the execution of Dr Crippen one hundred years ago, in 1910.

The Royal Society was founded in 1660 to promote scientific research. Through a process of trial and error, this completely new kind of institution slowly...

In 1817, during a period of economic hardship following the war with France, a motley crew of stocking-makers, stonemasons, ironworkers and labourers from a...

When Penguin Books was acquitted of obscenity for publishing Lady Chatterley’s Lover, a door was kicked open to the social revolution of the 1960s....

Joanna Bourke reviews Fiona Reid's latest book about the men who suffered shell shock in the aftermath of the First World War.

Juliet Gardiner reviews a book on the history and design of these monuments to consumerism.

Patrick Little reviews a book by kevin Sharpe.

Paul Lay casts his eye over a website dedicated to studying the Italian Front in the First World War.

Eric J. Evans reviews a political biography.

Julie Wheelwright reviews James Morton's new history of First World War spies.

Juliet Gardiner reviews a book on the poets of the First World World.

Ian Mortimer reviews a book on medieval history by Robert Fossier.

Daniel Snowman reviews a book by Tim Blanning


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