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Volume: 56 Issue: 2

Contents of History Today, February 2006

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Jacob Middleton investigates the eccentric set of prejudices against shaving that led our Victorian forefathers to adorn their chins with a lush growth of facial...

Westminster Abbey, England’s necropolis for royalty and other notables, reveals more secrets.

Alison Barnes has unearthed a transcription of the Privy Purse Accounts of Charles II that fills the gap for 1666, for which year the originals are now lost. They...

Kendrick Oliver revisits the scene of a massacre that became a watershed in public perceptions of the Vietnam war.

Gillian Mawrey, editor of Historic Gardens Review, introduces the study of historic gardens as a hotbed of historical research, sheer pleasure and campaigning for...

Account of the Navy is awarded British Academy’s annual prize.

The Theosophists Helena Blavatsky, Annie Besant, Margaret Cousins and others went to India at the end of the 19th century to search for God and universal...

David Culbert looks at the development of radio news commentary in the United States in the late 1930s and the political climate that shaped it.

Cartoon historian Mark Bryant looks at the work of one artist who took on the power of Tammany Hall and won – and his protégé whose enemies resorted to drawing up...

Long before the appearance of green, brown and black bins on our doorsteps we recycled our household rubbish. Tim Cooper investigates the history of waste recovery....

Art historian and museologist Julian Spalding finds nothing to beat looking carefully at historic objects in their original surroundings.

The Soviet leader gave his famous speech on 'The Personality Cult and its Consequences' in a closed session on February 25th, 1956.

Archaeologists in Italy are uncovering fascinating evidence about the origins of Italy’s medieval hilltop villages to create a new and compelling picture of the...

The Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company, later to be known as Kellog's, was founded on February 19th, 1906.

Few works of art are as closely linked to history as the gold salt cellar commissioned by Francis I of France in 1541 from the Florentine goldsmith and sculptor,...

Alex Sanmark tells the strange tale of the ill-fated marriage of Philip Augustus of France and his Danish princess at the end of the twelfth century.

Henry VIII may be our most famous monarch, a man who still bestrides English history as mightily as he dominated his kingdom nearly 500 years ago – but how well do...


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