Who's Who

Volume: 47 Issue: 4

Felipe Fernández-Armesto takes up the cudgels for historical accuracy.

The decisive victory for the Holy Roman Empire was won on April 24th, 1547.

Robert Irwin on how Islam saw the Christian invaders.

Gordon Marsden looks at how a Passion portrayal by one of the Middle Ages' most enigmatic painters, unlocks the door to the intense world of late medieval religious devotion.

Dresden was carpet-bombed by the allied forces over two nights in February 1945. Anthony Clayton on how the aftermath of war has tested belief in the city.

Richard Cavendish unravels Crimean and other military links at Deene Park in Northamptonshire.

Onward Christian Socialists? Mark Bevir takes a timely look at a little-known phenomenon that was part of turn-of-the-century radicalism in Britain.

John France recounts the against-the-odds narrative of the capture of the Holy City by the forces of the First Crusade.

We publish below the winning entry of the 1997 Longman/History Today Essay Prize, answering the question: 'Is 1990s history still too much his-tory and not enough her-story? How far should historians take into account political correctness and past injustices to groups in presenting their versions of the past?'

Alexander Bely looks at the potent mix of history and politics in the defining national identity in a new 'White Russia' - the post-Soviet Union State of Belarus.

In the first of our mini-series on the Nazis and social culture, Lisa Pine looks at how lessons in the classroom were perverted in the service of the Third Reich.

Recent stories