Making History

Explicit Content

Rude words are a constant, but their ability to cause offence is in flux. Historians should know their flim-flam from their fiddle-faddle

Matters of Importance

There are several obstacles between Tudor women and their biographers. Bypassing them is a slow but necessary process. 

The Continuity of Community

The support and camaraderie of close-knit communities were a double-edged sword. Nothing was private and reputations could be ruined at the twitch of the curtain.

A Ventriloquist Act?

Recent studies show the benefits and limitations of giving voice to the thoughts of our predecessors. 

Fishing for the Facts

E.H. Carr’s belief that the histories we get depend on the questions we ask is more relevant than ever. 

Open Access, Closed Minds

Plans to measure the impact of historical research as if it were a science will mean fewer history books that excite the general reader. 

Make Believe

Historians are tethered to the archive, but sometimes fixing the gaps requires the techniques of a novelist.