Andrew Robinson

Thiruvalluvar statue at Kanya Kumari, Tamil Nadu, India.

An eclectic account of the complex history of south India, where centuries move back and forth.

The Antikythera mechanism

Since its surprising discovery on the Aegean seabed over a century ago, the Antikythera mechanism has intrigued astrologers, classicists and historians of science. 

Company painting depicting an official of the East India Company, c. 1760

A persuasively argued but one-sided account of the economic and political failings of British rule in India.

Granite lid of the sarcophagus of Rameses III  (d.1155 BC)

The Fitzwilliam Museum houses an extraordinary collection and has a lustrous reputation. It also has an intriguing history.

Terracotta figure with a headdress of flowers, rings and a belt, c.3000 BC.

The civilisation that arose in the Indus valley around 5,000 years ago was only discovered in the early 20th century. Andrew Robinson looks at what we know about this extraordinary culture.

An exhibition at the Bodleian Libraries, Oxford.

Andrew Robinson recalls conversations with the famous director about his work, and in particular the recently re-released Urdu film, The Chess Players, made in the 1970s, which explores events surrounding the British annexation of Oudh in 1856.

Andrew Robinson marvels at the brain power and breadth of knowledge of the 18th-century polymath Thomas Young. He examines his relationship with his contemporaries, particularly with the French Egyptologist Champollion, and how he has been viewed subsequently by historians.

Andrew Robinson looks at some linguistic puzzles still facing historians.

Andrew Robinson enjoys contradicting the image too many people have of the medieval period.