Volume 55 Issue 4 April 2005

The two halves of the railway tunnel linking Switzerland and Italy met on April 2nd, 1905.

Richard Cavendish charts the events leading up to the execution of Marin Falier, Doge of Venice, on April 18th, 1355.

David Nicholas suggests that America’s involvement in northern Europe was unwittingly shaped by a British War Office official, against the wishes of the President.

Jack Lohman, Director of the Museum of London, explains the significance of two Victorian paintings and why the Museum is delighted to have been able to acquire them.

Nigel Saul looks at a building which embodied much of England’s religious and political life in the later Middle Ages, and which staged the blessing of the Prince of Wales’s marriage on April 9th 2005.

T.P. Wiseman looks at the development of the myth of ancient Rome, derived from the way its history has been seen.

Kevin Haddick Flynn revisits the career and reassesses the character of this great Irish patriot.

Richard Cavendish marks the anniversary of the publication of Dr Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language, on April 15th, 1755.

John Man, author of biographies of Genghis Khan and Attila, traces the journey that took him to Mongolia and Hungary, with a detour to the Gobi, and reveals the secrets of mounted archery.

Sarah Parker has curated an exhibition on the extraordinary ‘village’ community inhabiting Grace and Favour apartments at Hampton Court Palace, which, for the first time, opens one of these apartments to the public.

Alexander Orlov, veteran of the Great Patriotic War, provides a Russian perspective on the battle for Berlin, and the controversies that have surrounded it as the 60th anniversary commemorations approach.

Denise Silvester-Carr describes the trials and tribulations of a fine Georgian House recently re-opened by English Heritage.

Patricia Fara marks two significant Einstein anniversaries and points out some contradictions in the reputation of this great scientific hero.

Daniel Snowman meets Jeremy Black, prolific chronicler of British, European and worldwide diplomatic, military, cultural and cartographic history, and much else besides.