Volume 36 Issue 12 December 1986

Gerald Kennedy shows how a fear of revolution and the growing strength of organised labour created tensions in Britain after the end of the First World War. Men such as 'Woodbine Willie' attempted to defuse the situation by preaching the gospel of 'Christian Socialism' at mass meetings across the country.

Medieval man fused existing elements of pagan midwinter rites with the developing theology of Christmas in an appeal to the senses of both sacred and lay.

Willam Laud, Charles I's Archbishop of Canterbury and a formidable opponent of Puritanism, was executed on 10 January 1645. Charles Carlton examines his little-known nocturnal life. 

J A Sharpe looks into the work carried out by social historians.

A look into the history of a spectacular gold pendant unearthed in Yorkshire.

Felix Barker tells the tale of the newly resorted mill wheel at Styal.

A look back over a century of The English Historical Review.

Francis Robinson explores new educational and cultural advances in the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan.

Tony Aldous reveals the story behind Faversham and a gunpowder works built there around the mid-16th century

Peter Salway examines the image Roman writers and commanders had of their island province.

Bernard Porter looks into Britain’s line over terrorism during the nineteenth century.