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EDITOR'S CHOICE

Two hundred years before Captain Cook, Dieppe map makers placed the Portuguese flag on a large land-mass called Java-la-Grande approximately where Australia appears on today's atlas. Helen Wallis...

This year marks the centenary of a forgotten effort to carve out a Jewish homeland in the vast Portuguese colony of Angola. Adam Rovner describes the little-known attempt to create a Zion in Africa.

Volume: 62 Issue: 12 2012

Goa fell to Indian troops on December 19th 1961.

Volume: 61 Issue: 12 2011

As the marriage of Prince William and Kate Middleton approaches, Jenifer Roberts looks at the series of 18th-century weddings which led the Portuguese royal family into dynastic crisis.

Volume: 61 Issue: 4 2011

Richard Cavendish describes the Battle of Albuera, on May 16th, 1811.

Volume: 61 Issue: 5 2011

In the late 18th century, a French invasion force marched into Portugal. Napoleon was insisting that Portugal must close its ports to British shipping. When it failed to comply, the invading army was given orders to march on Lisbon and seize the royal family. The Queen and her family fled to Brazil, and by this time, Maria I of Portugal had been insane for more than fifteen years. 

Volume: 57 Issue: 12 2007
May 3rd, 1751
Volume: 51 Issue: 5 2001

Richard Cavendish explains how a fleet led by Pedro Alvarez Cabral reached the Brazilian coast on April 21st, 1500.

Volume: 50 Issue: 4 2000

Cherry Barnett recalls the history of Europe’s last colonial toehold in China, as the Portuguese colony of Macao returns to rule by Beijing.

Volume: 49 Issue: 12 1999

Edward Norman on the Eastern promise of Western sainthood to be encountered in the Church of the Bom Jesus in Goa.

Volume: 43 Issue: 3 1993

Kings knight knights, but who knights kings? Peter Linehan looks at how Alfonso XI got round the problem and in the process strengthened his hold on his kingdom.

Volume: 43 Issue: 3 1993

Two hundred years before Captain Cook, Dieppe map makers placed the Portuguese flag on a large land-mass called Java-la-Grande approximately where Australia appears on today's atlas. Helen Wallis sifts through the cartographic evidence to examine the intriguing question.

Volume: 38 Issue: 3 1988

Bartholomew Dias' voyage to the Cape of Good Hope in the late 15th century marked the apex of an extraordinary Portuguese expansion overseas and the start of a fateful European impact on South Africa. 

Volume: 38 Issue: 6 1988

Helen Wallis charts the Portugal's astonishing success in voyages of exploration between 1415 and 1520

Volume: 36 Issue: 6 1986

World wars, dictatorship and the tensions of empire tested, but not to breaking point, the alliance in the twentieth century. Tom Gallagher outlines how economic and strategic considerations made Portugal a focus for Allied concern in the Second World War.

Volume: 36 Issue: 6 1986

John of Gaunt's dynastic ambitions coincided with the urgent need of the Portuguese Crown for foreign support to secure its sovereign independence - the catalyst for a royal marriage and England's oldest alliance.

Volume: 36 Issue: 6 1986

Port wine and a queen for England from Braganza - commercial and cultural links strengthened the alliance steadily during the Age of Reason.

Volume: 36 Issue: 6 1986

During the sixteen years of Portugal's first Republic there were forty-five governments. Douglas Wheeler shows how this turbulent period of parliamentary rule gave birth to the Estado Novo (the New State), Europe's longest surviving authoritarian system of the twentieth century.

Volume: 31 Issue: 9 1981

The career of Colonel Fernando Santos Costa explodes the myth of Salazar's Portugal as a politically stable country with 'no history'. In charge of Portugal's army for twenty-two years, Santos Costa played a powerful and often unscrupulous role within this dictatorship.

Volume: 31 Issue: 2 1981

Four hundred years ago, explains Stephen Clissold, Portugal was joined with Spain in a sixty-year long and unpopular union.

Volume: 30 Issue: 7 1980

The last Huguenot to become a Marshal of France, Schomberg died in exile, fighting for William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne. By C.R. Boxer.

Volume: 26 Issue: 10 1976

C.R. Boxer describes how the Spanish and Portuguese empires were troubled by smugglers and interlopers on the high seas.

Volume: 22 Issue: 3 1972

C.R. Boxer profiles an Anglo-Irish Protestant at the Portuguese Court, 1728-41.

Volume: 20 Issue: 12 1970

Throughout his long life, including his years in Russia, Ribeiro Sanches kept in touch with ‘Men of Reason’ in many European countries.

Volume: 20 Issue: 4 1970

G.V. Orange describes how, towards the end of the fifteenth century, Portuguese navigators rounded the Cape of Good Hope.

Volume: 18 Issue: 5 1968

C.R. Boxer offers a study of the religious problems in early Roman Catholic missions.

Volume: 17 Issue: 11 1967

C.R. Boxer writes that, taken in conjunction, the Portuguese and Spanish voyages of discovery in the fifteenth century form one of the watersheds of history, comparable to the twentieth-century conquest of space.

Volume: 11 Issue: 1 1961

C.R. Boxer finds that the methods used - or alleged to have been used - by Portuguese proselytizers more than three hundred years ago, remain a “living issue in Ceylon politics.”

Volume: 8 Issue: 5 1958

For 444 years Goa has been ruled by the Portuguese; today their rule is challenged by the Republic of India. By C.R. Boxer.

Volume: 4 Issue: 11 1954

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