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EDITOR'S CHOICE

Paul Doolan looks at the continuing controversy over Dutch 'police operations' post-1945 in Indonesia.

The conquest of Java, now part of Indonesia, is one of the least known episodes of British imperialism. But this short interregnum influenced the governance of the Indian Raj and proved a significant stepping stone in the career of the founder of Singapore, says Tim Hannigan.

Volume: 61 Issue: 9 2011

Little remains of the great North African empire that was Rome's most formidable enemy, because, as Richard Miles explains, only its complete annihilation could satisfy its younger rival.

Volume: 60 Issue: 2 2010

Hywel Williams revisits an article by Peter Munz, first published in History Today in 1959, and asks who needed whose approval most, the great ruler of the Franks or Pope Leo III?

Volume: 60 Issue: 9 2010

Rowena Hammal examines the fears and insecurities, as well as the bombast and jingoism, in British thinking.

Issue: 68 2010

A cremation ghat built in Brighton for Indian soldiers who fought in the First World War has recently been inscribed with their names, writes Rosie Llewellyn-Jones.

Volume: 60 Issue: 10 2010

Rosie Llewellyn-Jones recalls the Victorian economist who helped resolve the financial crisis in India after the Mutiny of 1857.

Volume: 60 Issue: 8 2010

Football became a potent expression of Algeria’s struggle for independence, never more so than during the dramatic events that preceded the 1958 World Cup, as Martin Evans explains.

Volume: 60 Issue: 7 2010

The Great Exhibition of 1851 was not only a celebration of Victorian Britain’s scientific and economic pre-eminence but also a hymn to the religion that underpinned it, argues Geoffrey Cantor.

Volume: 60 Issue: 7 2010

The Democratic Republic of the Congo was founded on June 30th, 1960. Within a few days, however, there were army mutinies and disturbances around the country.

Volume: 60 Issue: 7 2010

For centuries, Africans were shipped to the Indian subcontinent and sold as slaves to regional rulers. Rosie Llewellyn-Jones tells the story of those who went to Lucknow to serve the Nawab of Oudh and who joined the Indian Mutiny when he was deposed by the British. For this allegiance their descendants, whom she has traced, still pay a price.

Volume: 59 Issue: 12 2009

The West Indies is home to a large and vibrant South Asian population descended from indentured labourers who worked the plantations after the abolition of slavery. The arrival of the first, from Bengal in 1838, is recorded in the journal of a young doctor who accompanied them, as Brigid Wells describes.

Volume: 59 Issue 10 2009

A century ago, the British authorities in India passed a series of reforms that they hoped would appease the subcontinent’s increasingly confident political movements. But, writes Denis Judd, it was too little, too late.

Volume: 59 Issue: 11 2009
Juliet Gardner reviews a book by Ashley Jackson
2009

With a solution to the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians as far away as ever, James Barker looks back to Britain’s occupation of the region and the efforts made by the future Viscount Montgomery to impose peace on its warring peoples.

Volume: 59 Issue: 3 2009
The Allies may be regarded as the ‘good guys’ of the Second World War, but the hypocrisy apparent in their treatment of colonial peoples drove many subjects into the arms of their enemies, as Mihir Bose explains.
Volume: 59 Issue 10 2009

As the Roman Empire declined its leaders became interested more in personal survival than good governance. Sound familiar? Adrian Goldsworthy draws comparisons with current crises.

Volume: 59 Issue: 5 2009

Richard Cavendish marks the anniversary of a violent post-First World War event in India

Volume: 59 Issue: 4 2009

In 1759, Admiral Hawke secured a daring victory over the French fleet at Quiberon Bay. It surpasses Nelson’s triumph at Trafalgar in its significance, claims Brian James.

Volume: 59 Issue: 12 2009

In 1947, as Zionist insurgents wreaked havoc, British special forces in Palestine adopted counterinsurgency tactics that attracted worldwide condemnation. David Cesarani discusses a scandal whose ramifications persist to this day.

Volume: 59 Issue: 3 2009

Marking the 250th anniversary of General Wolfe’s victory over the French at Quebec, Jeremy Black considers the strategy employed by British forces in their struggle to gain and hold Canada.

Volume: 59 Issue: 6 2009
Volume: 59 Issue: 8 2009

To understand why Americans believe their nation to be innocent of imperialism we must go back to the Founding Fathers of the Republic, says Graham MacPhee.

Volume: 58 Issue: 11 2008

In the event Spain and Portugal divided almost all of South America between, them but in the sixteenth century the French also had commercial and colonial ambitions in Brazil. Robert Knecht tells the stories of two French expeditions that ended in disaster.

Volume: 58 Issue: 12 2008

James Barker reveals how parsimony and muddle in Whitehall in the first years of the British Mandate in Palestine almost led to disaster in August 1929.

Volume: 58 Issue 6 2008
2008

Hugh Kearney reconsiders the models for and motives of Charles I's most controversial minister in 'John Bull's other island'.

2008

Dionysios Stathakopoulos surveys the history of the Byzantine Empire from its foundation in 324 to its conquest in 1453.

Volume: 58 Issue: 11 2008

Piers Brendon asks how we can arrive at a fair judgement of the benefits of the Empire for those who enjoyed – or endured – its rule.

Volume: 57 Issue: 10 2007
Neil Faulkner and Nick Saunders, Co-directors of the Great Arab Revolt Project, tell how a recent field trip to southern Jordan sheds light on the theories and exploits of T.E. Lawrence.
Volume: 57 Issue: 8 2007

Kevin Shillington looks at the impact on Africa of the slave trade, and its abolition 200 years ago this month.

Volume: 57 Issue: 3 2007

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