Ancient Greece

‘A palatable taster of what ancient literature and culture can do for us in the present day’; so the editors describe this short book. In their...

The stately, rhythmic elegance of Greek temple architecture has inspired generations of...

The romantic liaison between the great Amazon warrior queen and the conqueror of the known world has been much mythologised. But did such a delicious pairing really happen? Adrienne Mayor investigates.

Concealed within the folds of the Parnassian Mountains, Delphi is well positioned to maintain its secrets. In the ancient world, however, the...

Many paleoanthropologists believe that for most of history it is young people who were in charge. By Michael S. Cummings and Simon Maghakyan.

Pergamon became independent in the third century B.C.; Philip E. Burnham describes how its last king bequeathed his territory to Rome, and whence the Roman occupation of Asia began.

Stephen Usher looks back at the life of a leading Athenian orator and Idealist during the city’s long war with Macedonia and its Greek allies.

Nineteen hundred years ago, writes T.P. Wiseman, Vesuvius erupted and destroyed Pompeii. Were the giants imprisoned in the earth by Hercules breaking out to take terrible vengeance on gods and men?

In ancient Cretan religious rites, the bull and the young athletes who engaged it played a mysterious but highly significant role, writes Richard Harrison.

At a time when the Turkish rulers of Greece were conducting a profitable trade in ancient statues, Charles Fellows, an enlightened English tourist, rescued a precious hoard from Asia Minor. By Sarah Searight.

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