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By Gyanesh Kudaisya

Gyanesh Kudaisya describes the final years of India’s founding prime minister, a period marked by major challenges at home as well as abroad in the aftermath of the 1962 war with China.  

Rosamond Harcourt-Smith follows an eastern route to India during the early years of viceregal rule.

The Indian army that arrived in Marseilles six weeks after the start of the war was probably the most curious of the First World War. In a battle...

From the 1830s until the end of British rule, writes James Lunt, Simla was the summer capital of successive Governors-General and Viceroys.

William Seymour describes how independence for India in 1947 put an end to the long and close association of the Indian princes with British power.

At a discouraging time during the Second World War, writes Geoffrey Evans, British and Indian troops gained a spectacular victory over the Italian forces in East Africa.

Thousands were killed in December 1984 following a chemical reaction at a pesticide factory in India.

Asok Kumar Das describes how Mughal miniatures illuminate the flightless bird from the Indian Ocean, extinct since 1681.

Although “renowned for their interest in profits and dividends,” the Directors of the East India Company encouraged their servants to explore the field of natural history; Mildred Archer describes how British naturalists, when recording their researches, often employed a staff of gifted Indian artists.

Fifty years before the great struggle with the Japanese on the frontiers of India, writes Antony Brett-James, Manipur in 1891 was the scene of a gallant Victorian action.

Besides administering the sub-continent, British public servants devoted endless time and energy to making a record of Indian archaeological remains. Mildred Archer describes the role of the East India Company from 1785-1858.

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