History Today

The Byzantine Empire's ban on the veneration of icons died with its last iconoclast emperor on January 20th, 842.

Motivated by power and prestige, Europeans have long sought a route through the Arctic Ocean connecting the Atlantic with the Pacific. Despite many failures, the lure of the frozen north has enjoyed remarkable longevity. Philip Hatfield considers why. 

Attempts to control the spread of bank note forgery in India have proven ineffective and dangerous.

When Joe Biden said ‘God save the Queen’, was he heralding the end of the republic?

The Italian Social Republic, or Salò, was Mussolini’s German-backed experiment in ‘real Fascism’ and fine living. As Richard Bosworth explains, Italians find it hard to come to terms with its legacy.

The frontiersman and showman died on January 10, 1917.

While modern vegetarianism is concerned largely with issues of animal welfare, its roots are to be found in the desire to promote spirituality by curbing humanity’s excessive appetites, argues Erica Fudge.

Turkey has a long history of coups, but a failed attempt on the life of President Kemal Atatürk in 1926 had a lasting impact on the country. Stefan Ihrig reveals how one foreign journalist recorded the reprisals that followed with admiration – which soon turned to fear.

Behind the traditional story of archaeology, with its pith-helmeted Victorian gentlemen, are the equally important yet neglected stories of its female pioneers. Brenna Hassett shows how their lives are vital to the future of the discipline.

A recently discovered 17th-century shipwreck has caused speculation among experts. Richard Blakemore considers the often overlooked importance of maritime affairs on the course of the Civil Wars.