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EDITOR'S CHOICE

David Anderson looks at the contentious issues raised as Kenya comes to terms with the colonial past.

The opening naval battle of the First World War took place not in the North Sea but in Central Africa in August 1914. It would change the course of the African conflict in Britain’s favour, says Janie Hampton.

Volume: 64 Issue: 7 2014

Postwar decolonisation in West Africa saw tensions rise between the fading imperial powers of France and Britain, according to papers recently unearthed by Kathryn Hadley.

Volume: 63 Issue: 1 2013

The German First World War commander Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck has been described as the 20th century’s greatest guerrilla leader for his undefeated campaign in East Africa. Is the legend justified? Dan Whitaker considers the wider picture.

Volume: 63 Issue: 2 2013

While it is right to seek justice for those tortured and mistreated during the Kenyan Emergency of the 1950s, attempts to portray the conflict as a Manichean one are far too simplistic, argues Tim Stanley.

Volume: 62 Issue: 12 2012

In October 1935 Mussolini’s Fascist Italian forces invaded Abyssinia (now Ethiopia) at a crucial moment in the run-up to the Second World War. Daniel Whittall looks at the complex issues the invasion raised in Britain and the responses to it, especially from black Britons.

Volume: 60 Issue: 10 2010

John Hanning Speke discovered the source of the Nile on August 3rd, 1858.

Volume: 58 Issue 8 2008

Clive Foss introduces the Kharijites, a radical sect from the first century of Islam based in southern Iraq and Iran, who adopted an extreme interpretation of the Koran, ruthless tactics and opposed hereditary political leadership. After causing centuries of problems to the caliphate, they survive in a quietist form in East Africa and Oman.

Volume: 57 Issue: 12 2007

David Anderson, Huw Bennett and Daniel Branch believe that the Freedom of Information Act is being used to protect the perpetrators of a war crime that took place in Kenya fifty years ago.

Volume: 56 Issue: 8 2006

David Anderson looks at the contentious issues raised as Kenya comes to terms with the colonial past.

Volume: 55 Issue: 2 2005

The first-ever parliament of the Sudan was opened by the British governor-general, Sir Robert Howe, on January 1st, 1954.

Volume: 54 Issue: 1 2004

Started in 1947, to grow peanuts in Tanganyika as a contribution to both the African and British economies, the Groundnuts Scheme was abandoned four years later on January 9th, 1951.

Volume: 51 Issue: 1 2001

David Rooney describes the extraordinary exploits of Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck, the German soldier who kept the Allies tied down in Africa throughout the Great War.

Volume: 49 Issue: 11 1999

The massacre of the army of Sudanese Dervishes on a plain near Omdurman on September 2nd, 1898, was an occasion that a new military technology by Britain in battle. 

Volume: 48 Issue: 9 1998

Charles Townshend evaluates the judgement of General Gordon and the ill-fated British mission in the Sudan.

Volume: 35 Issue: 3 1985

Darrell Bates describes Queen Victoria's special affection for young people of exotic origin. One for whom she especially cared was Prince Alamayu of Abyssinia.

Volume: 29 Issue: 12 1979

Nora C. Buckley explains how, during the fifteenth century, Chinese seafarers were active in Indian and African trade.

Volume: 25 Issue: 7 1975

Patricia Wright describes the first Italian attempt to capture Ethiopia.

Volume: 23 Issue: 3 1973

During the winter of 1935-6, writes Patricia Wright, Italian armies overran Ethiopia and annexed the Empire to the Italian Crown.

Volume: 23 Issue: 4 1973

Prospects seemed encouraging for the Italian Empire in 1940, writes Patricia Wright, but an arduous defeat ensued.

Volume: 23 Issue: 5 1973

Patricia Wright describes how the French arrival upon the Upper Nile caused an international crisis.

Volume: 22 Issue: 8 1972

On November 17th, 1874, when Henry Morton Stanley marched away from Bagamoyo on what was to be his greatest exploring achievement, he was retracing his own steps of 1871 along the well-worn caravan route used by Burton and Speke in 1857; by Speke and Grant in 1860, and, writes C.E. Hamshere, many Arab traders before them.

Volume: 18 Issue: 10 1968

Robin Hallett describes how, when the maritime powers of Europe were battling for supremacy in the Orient, the isles of the Indian Ocean played their part in history.

Volume: 16 Issue: 5 1966

C.E. Hamshere shows how, a fortnight after the Armistice of 1918, the elusive German Commander in East Africa surrendered at Abercorn in what is now Zambia.

Volume: 15 Issue: 4 1965

Michael Langley describes how missionary endeavour, the ambition of Cecil Rhodes and the technology of mining engineers combined to create the background of modern Zambia.

Volume: 15 Issue: 12 1965

The Land of Zanj included the coastal regions of the modern colonies of Kenya and Tanganyika. Here, writes C.R. Boxer, the Portuguese, first among Europeans, came into contact with the Arab-African civilization that flourished on the edges of the Indian Ocean.

Volume: 9 Issue: 11 1959

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