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Michael Biddiss

Michael Biddiss looks at how the victorious Allies dealt with the unprecedented prosecution of genocide and mass atrocities by the Nazi leadership and how fair the proceedings were to those in the dock.

This winter I shall be rereading A la recherche du temps perdu. It is not, I concede, everyone's idea of evening relaxation by the fire-side. But those who have come to love this sinuous masterpiece will know well the kind of delights I anticipate.

For readers of this magazine the quality of the articles presented in its pages month by month will have provided, one hopes, ample evidence for the continuing intellectual vitality of historical scholarship, and indeed ample confirmation of the value of communicating this to the widest possible audience.

Michael Biddiss on the tale of a French village massacred by the SS in June 1944.

War is prominent among the forms of human experience that have most readily stimulated poetry. In combat both mind and body strain at the end of their tether.